Pseudoscience

Neurophilosophy

Category archives for Pseudoscience

The notorious Australian bushranger Edward “Ned” Kelly was apprehended in 1878, following a confrontation during which he and his gang killed three policemen. Upon his arrest, Kelly was thus described by the police: 5’10″ tall, weight 11st 4lbs, medium build, sallow complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, scar on top of head, two scars on…

I don’t endorse this crap

Please be aware that I do not endorse any of the products being advertised by Proximic at the bottom of the side bar on the right. I am responsible for the content of the side bar on the left and, of course, for all of the written material on this blog, but I have no…

Best-selling fantasy writer Terry Pratchett, who announced in December that he has a rare form of early onset Alzheimer’s, has pledged $1million for research into the disease. In a speech given ealier today at the Alzheimer’s Research Trust Netowrk Conference in Bristol, Pratchett said that he compliments his conventional treatment with various unspecified alternative remedies,…

U.S. military calls Ghostbusters

Among the one third of Americans who believe in ghosts are high-ranking officials in the intelligence agencies and military. In the 1970s and 80s, the CIA funded research into “remote viewing”, so that they could train clairvoyants to locate, among other things, Colonel Gaddafi and the U.S. marines kidnapped by Hizbollah. More recently, it was…

U.S. military psychic spy manual

Remote viewing is a form of “psychoenergetic perception” (i.e. clairvoyance) developed as part of a long-term $20 million research program initiated by U.S. intelligence agencies in the early 1970s. Now known by the codename Stargate, the program was initiated largely in response to the belief that the Soviets were spending large amounts of money on…

BibliOdyssey: Must-have blog book

This brain map comes from The Book of Life: The Spiritual and Physical Constitution of Man (1912), by the obscure mystical philosopher Alesha Sivartha, who is sometimes referred to as a “grandfather of the new-age movement”. The map is of particular interest, as it approaches modern neurology but still retains a few elements of phrenology,…

Conscientiology & Projectiology

I received an email earlier today from one Nelson Abreu, who offered a criticism of the experimentally-induced out-of-body experiences that were reported recently, in the hope that I might post a reaction on my blog. In his message, Mr. Abreu tells me that the studies “reveal interesting things about dissociated perceptions under virtual reality conditions,…

M.D. vs. quack

Earlier this week, I posted an email I received about a nutritional supplement called EM Power Plus. The makers of this product, a Canadian company called TrueHope, claim that it can alleviate the symptoms of bipolar disorder.   In the comments to that post, PalMD, author of the WhiteCoatUnderground blog, is having what appears to…

Email from a quack

I received this email yesterday: Hello, I just read your post [on augmented cognition] and found it intriguing. I have been experimenting with a nutritional supplement for the past several years which was designed to treat bi-polar disorder (and it works amazing well for that purpose according to all the researchers who have studied it)…