Pharyngula

Bob Woodruff: one among many

The Committee to Protect Journalists lists 61 reporters killed in Iraq, 13 killed by the US.

Iraq, the most dangerous place for journalists in 2005, also became the deadliest conflict for the media in CPJ’s 24-year history. A total of 60 journalists have been killed on duty in Iraq from the beginning of the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003 through the end of 2005. The toll surpasses the 58 journalists killed in the Algerian conflict from 1993 to 1996.

Reporters without borders lists 79 dead.

I wonder if this recent serious wounding of Bob Woodruff will finally make people notice?

Comments

  1. #1 Walter
    January 29, 2006

    Probably not. Being in the business, the usual reaction from the public is “Well, they (reporters) shouldn’t be there anyway. They just make trouble.” But this incidents like this should give people pause when our leaders tell us how much the Iraqi situation is improving. This is sure-fire proof that it isn’t.

  2. #2 Mason Foley
    January 29, 2006

    At least CNN gave it a blurb:

    Reporting from Iraq is a dangerous proposition. According to the organization Reporters Without Borders, 79 journalists and assistants have been killed in the war zone since the United States invaded in March 2003.

    But it was the last parapgraph in the story (as of 12:49 PM est).

  3. #3 Caledonian
    January 29, 2006

    The article suggests that Mr. Woodruff has suffered head injuries, but it doesn’t specify what kind. Are we talking lacerations or shrapnel-induced brain damage?

  4. #4 Roman Werpachowski
    January 29, 2006

    Probably not. Being in the business, the usual reaction from the public is “Well, they (reporters) shouldn’t be there anyway. They just make trouble.” But this incidents like this should give people pause when our leaders tell us how much the Iraqi situation is improving. This is sure-fire proof that it isn’t.

    Not so sure about that. Reporters put themselves in harm’s way more than civilians do. Theoretically, security of the ordinary Iraqis may improve without a similar improvement of the security of the journalists. This said, I don’t know about any objective data on this. Everyone who has some numbers also has some reason to skew them.

  5. #5 Kristjan Wager
    January 29, 2006

    As far as I can see from the link, it’s 60, not 61. Though that makes absolutely no difference.

  6. #6 Unstable Isotope
    January 29, 2006

    I wonder what will happen. Will all American journalists pull out of Iraq now? What will that do to the quality of reporting on Iraq?

  7. #7 Linkmeister
    January 29, 2006

    From a Knight Ridder story:

    “ABC officials in New York said that both Woodruff, 44, and Vogt, 46, were wearing body armor and helmets, but had suffered shrapnel wounds to the head. Both men were taken by helicopter to a U.S. military hospital in Balad, Iraq. Following surgery, both were listed in serious but stable condition, said ABC News President David Westin.”

  8. #8 Mason Foley
    January 29, 2006

    I doubt that this will have a significant impact on the presence of journalists in the theatre. Books have been written however of the “quality” of the content of the news stateside and I don’t suspect that will change in the consolidated media we are submitted to on a daily basis. The immediate tragedy of this incident shouldn’t be lost but we must keep an eye out for the integrity of the media.

  9. #9 skeptic
    January 30, 2006

    Make people notice what? That journalists put themselves in the line of danger more than many other people?

  10. #10 wondering...
    January 30, 2006

    “But this incidents like this should give people pause when our leaders tell us how much the Iraqi situation is improving. This is sure-fire proof that it isn’t.”

    Huh? Because a couple of journalists get hurt this is sign that the situation is not improving? Seriously, people get killed every day in Iraq – why do you think that journalists deserve more notice, or that their injuries are any kind of sign?

    As if a “sign” were needed anyway…

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