Pharyngula

Circus of the Spineless #18

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The last time I hosted the Circus of the Spineless, I just did a series of photos—invertebrates are wonderfully photogenic. Here we go again, with another collection of gorgeous images of crunchy, squishy, slimy, tentacled, multi-legged, no-legged creatures.


Arthropods


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SEF sent me this nice image of an Adalia imago, but no link—and also says there is a whole life history in photos. I’ll update this if they’re put online!


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Here’s a photoessay on the Black Swallowtail butterfly.


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Dragonflies in March? This photo is from last summer.


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This is a nest of Jewel bugs, with a closeup here.


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How do bees sense that wiggle dance? The proprioceptive organs in a bee’s antenna are very sensitive.


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An invasive species, the lime swallowtail, is spreading through the New World!


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Another invasion: Asian wasps invade France.


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There really is a transparent shrimp in that picture. There are also photos of more visible crustaceans.


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Japanese beetles, in addition to their nuisance value in our gardens, embrace the patriarchy and guard their mates.


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How perverse: ants ripping off their mate’s abdomen. Maybe there’s something to say for the patriarchy.


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After killing this loud visitor, we get poetry about crickets.


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More butterflies: Polydamus swallowtail larvae.


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It gets cold up north, and the bees catch a chill.


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The largest moth in the US is the Black Witch, with a 7 inch wingspan.


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Moths use gyroscopes to stabilize their flight.


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A pretty stick insect.


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A crab spider with poetry, and a bonus: a porcelain crab.


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Babies are so cute, aren’t they? Especially if they are huntsman spiderlings.


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Here’s a photoessay on fishing spiders.


Molluscs


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Taningia danae, a squid that hunts with bioluminescence, was popular.


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Deep Sea News has more photos of Taningia.


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When you hold them up to your ear, you can hear screaming.


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The eight-armed cuttle has been an object of fascination for at least one hundred and thirty years.


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There was a little controversy in the sequencing of a clam genome.


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Certain species of snakes have asymmetric jaws to winkle a snail out of its shell.


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Sea slugs have spectacular sex liveswith extra diversity.


Echinoderms


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Sea cucumbers feeding—with video!


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Cool as a cucumber on the Antarctic sea floor.


Worms


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Sneaky parasitic worms manipulate their host’s sense of smell so that they’ll get eaten.


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Polychaete worms have elaborate feeding structures.


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Go to Hawaii—see the marine worms!


Chordates


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I had never, ever considered eating sea squirts, but here’s a YouTube video showing how to cook Halocynthia roretzi.


Cnidarians


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How sad. Our only cnidarian representatives are beached Portuguese man-o’-war.


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Witness the carnage!.


Percolozoa


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Here’s the coolest phylum I didn’t know much about before, with a ciliate-flagellate transitional form.


The next edition of CotS will be at Burning Silo at the end of March.