Pharyngula

Hitchens on The Daily Show

Eh.

It wasn’t bad. Hitchens declared some laudable objectives for his book: he wants to end the idea that calling someone a person of faith is a compliment, and he laid out his position on the origins of religion. It’s built on fear of the dark, fear of death, and hatred of sex, and those aren’t sound bases for rational thought. So the sentiment was good.

Presentation … well, that wasn’t so good. I know Hitchens can be eloquent, but he wasn’t. He bumbled about and couldn’t quite manage to put two coherent sentences together.

I’m still getting the book, but I don’t think his performance tonight would have persuaded anybody who wasn’t already one of those uncompromising atheists.


You can watch the interview yourself over at onegoodmove.

Comments

  1. #1 rebecca
    May 1, 2007

    If you ever get the chance you ought to read When God Was A Woman by Merlin Stone. It’s an interesting book about pre-Christian/Judeo religions and makes a lot of interesting points of why todays religion is what it is today.

  2. #2 Mike Haubrich
    May 1, 2007

    Will E

    I found more out about the ancient world’s mythologies, and how Xianity is a deceptive patchwork of many of them. *That* made me conclude that all religions are false. So Hitchens is on the right track with this type of comparative thinking.

    That kind of did it for me, but I also leared to separate referential truth (literal truth) from the sort of truth learned in myth and fiction. Myths are useful in building fluid solidarity in social groups, whether the facts of the story are true or made up. Religions that use mythology for theology make the mistake of thinking that the story that they carry to validate their religion has referential truth.

    Campbell made a pretty good career of making this point:

    Chief Seattle’s Sales Agreement

  3. #3 bunnycatch3r
    September 19, 2008

    P.S – I really enjoyed the book. Hitchens, Dawkins, Harris, and Dennet, have all showed me in the last year, that I am not alone.

    Du Er Ikke Alene

  4. #4 bunnycatch3r
    September 19, 2008

    P.S – I really enjoyed the book. Hitchens, Dawkins, Harris, and Dennet, have all showed me in the last year, that I am not alone.

    Du Er Ikke Alene

  5. #5 Holly Judd
    January 7, 2009

    If you read my post again, you’ll see that I said “the original written language …” If you can find me a Xian writing in Hebrew or Aramaic that pre-dates Paul (of Tarsus, not Zach Meyers), then I’ll concede the point.