Pharyngula

Time-Blind?

While reading the book Time, Love, Memory I ran across the phrase, time-blind. It was used in the context of saying that without clock genes, genes that define our circadian rythm, we would be time-blind. Is this possible, are there people who have no concept of the passage of time?

Comments

  1. #1 David Marjanovi?, OM
    November 6, 2007

    That’s no reason to be surprised. If it were 2[p]m in the afternoon, then you’d have something.

    This message brought to you by the Department of Redundancy Department.

    It still bears repeating.

    On another note, there once was an experiment where people lived in a basement for weeks or months with no external cues of time. The idea was to find out their internal wake-sleep patterns. Lo and behold, diversity. Some took a nap every 4 hours. Others turned out to have a 50-hour day that included sleeping 16 hours at once (and were surprised at the end of the experiment that it had taken much longer than they had thought).

    For the record, I bet I belong in the latter group, except that I sleep 10 hours out of 24…

  2. #2 David Marjanovi?, OM
    November 6, 2007

    Oopsie. I completely missed the joke. Too tired. I interpreted it to mean that if you had confused not 4 but 16 hours with 1 hour, that would be something to write home about, and agreed with that.

  3. #3 David Marjanovi?, OM
    November 6, 2007

    On the micro scale, I have absolutely no idea how long any task might take. No matter if I’ve already done it 10 times. When I see that I run out of time, I think I just need to speed up, even though this has never worked before. That way I can miss a train while gazing at a clock all the time.

  4. #4 Steve
    November 7, 2007

    Yes. I’m married to someone who is “time-blind.”