Pharyngula

Friday Cephalopod: Veiny

i-c120f08075b9fd754f537776b358c635-octopus_marginatus.jpg
Octopus marginatus

Figure from Cephalopods: A World Guide (amzn/b&n/abe/pwll), by Mark Norman.

Comments

  1. #1 Bride of Shrek
    May 9, 2008

    Oh. What a sweet little chappy. I wish I was his mum.

  2. #2 CortxVortx
    May 9, 2008

    Veiny

    Vidi

  3. #3 deviljelly
    May 9, 2008

    hey pz,

    check out this funky video of one of these little suckers cutting up the dance floor.

  4. #4 deviljelly
    May 9, 2008
  5. #5 Christopher Waldrop
    May 9, 2008

    How do we know he’s a he? My first thought (for reasons I can’t explain) was, Wow, she’s beautiful! I tend to assume both cephalopods and spiders are always female. Depending on the species of spider I have a pretty good chance of being right, but with the cephalopods, well, it’s 50-50, right?

  6. #6 clinteas
    May 9, 2008

    Looks like a Platypus,dont he……

  7. #7 Bishop Pontoppodan
    May 9, 2008

    “one of the most remarkable discoveries of recent decades is that genomes are not static, fixed entities that evolve as one; instead, they are highly dynamic. From one generation to the next, stretches of DNA may appear or disappear, or move from one location to another. From time to time, entire new genes appear and become established, thus expanding the organisms’ genetic repertoire.

    But where do new genes come from?

    http://tinyurl.com/6mkzx6

  8. #8 JRS
    May 9, 2008

    Looks delicious. Saute with butter, garlic and parsley. Serve with a slice of lemon and sides of potatoes and steamed vegetables.

  9. #9 Carlie
    May 9, 2008

    Veiny.

    Vidi.

    Vici! (Oh, come on, someone had to.)

    Pretty colors.

  10. #10 David Marjanovi?, OM
    May 9, 2008

    But where do new genes come from?

    Genes are sometimes duplicated by copying errors or mitosis or meiosis mistakes, and then one of the copies is free to mutate.

    In very rare cases, junk DNA mutates into a gene. This is where the gene for the antifreeze protein of icefish comes from: basically, a start codon and a stop codon appeared in the middle of nowhere by random mutation.

  11. #11 David Marjanovi?, OM
    May 9, 2008

    In other words, ultimately, nothing is ever really new. :-)

  12. #12 Ron Sullivan
    May 9, 2008

    Veiny

    Vidi

    Vichy.

    Back to the water!

  13. #13 impiri
    May 9, 2008

    It looks kinda like a hippo facing to the left with its mouth wide open.

    I can’t unsee it.

  14. #14 Emmet Caulfield
    May 9, 2008

    Veiny.

    Vidi.

    Vici! (Oh, come on, someone had to.)

    Except that the pronunciation of “v” in Latin as a voiced labiodental fricative is a mediæval innovation — uncool as it sounds, it would have been pronounced by the Romans, including Cæsar, of course, much more like “wehny weedy weeky”.

  15. #15 Sloan
    May 9, 2008

    Emmet is technically correct. My first Latin teacher hammered this into us and we had to pronounce the ‘v’ as a ‘w.’ She was kinda old-school like that.

  16. #16 Avekid
    May 9, 2008

    The Latin pronunciation that always cracked me up — ‘cuz I’m lame like that — was “civi”. It always seemed so silly.

    Thanks for the Friday Ceph, PZ! He’s a beauty.

  17. #17 David Marjanovi?, OM
    May 9, 2008

    Not medieval — the emperor Valentinianus was already transcribed by the Greeks with beta rather than with omikron ypsilon, so the shift must have happened sometime between him and Valerius (Oualerios). But of course Caesar lived much earlier than both.

  18. #18 Taollan
    May 9, 2008

    Just a fun fact: Octopus marginatus is now Amphioctopus marginatus. Ever shifting taxonomy is so much fun.

  19. #19 bunnycatch3r
    May 9, 2008

    What would cause a cephalopod to break out with such a bright smile?

  20. #20 Kseniya
    May 9, 2008

    it would have been pronounced by the Romans, including Cæsar, of course, much more like “wehny weedy weeky”

    Ah! That explains “Fwee Bwian!!” Sort of.

  21. #21 lisa
    May 9, 2008

    Beautiful!

  22. #22 Brownian, OM
    May 9, 2008

    Did you guys watch the videos deviljelly linked to? Did you?!

  23. #23 Alligator
    May 9, 2008

    Neat video!

    What’s with the webbing? It seems like it would inhibit mobility somewhat (that opinion is based on nothing concrete). Is it a “retractable” feature to make the little cutie-pie look bigger when threatened?

    I think this is my favorite Friday cephalopod.

  24. #24 David Marjanovi?, OM
    May 9, 2008

    I wrote…

    Genes are sometimes duplicated by copying errors or mitosis or meiosis mistakes, and then one of the copies is free to mutate.

    I just read the platypus genome paper. It mentions that the casein genes (for a group of milk proteins) derive from duplicates of genes for an enamel protein. That’s right, milk is mutated tooth enamel. :-)

    As I wrote: ultimately, nothing is ever really new.

  25. #25 Sili
    May 9, 2008

    Absolutely gorgeous.

  26. #26 Darles Chickens
    May 9, 2008

    “wehny weedy weeky”

    Cowwect, my fwiend, Biggus Dickus.

  27. #27 TheWireMonkey
    May 9, 2008

    Pretty pretty cPod.

  28. #28 (((Billy)))
    May 9, 2008

    Beautiful animal.

    Just curious. Given the tradition, are you a Detroit Redwings fan Mr. Myers?

  29. #29 Blind Squirrel FCD
    May 9, 2008

    Come on now PZ, those are not actually veins as in part of the circulatory system, are they?

  30. #30 Will Von Wizzlepig
    May 9, 2008

    There’s a second link on this page to a video of the same kind of octopus pretending to be an algae whilst walking along on two legs.

    It’s very Dr. Seuss.

    http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2005/03/24_octopus.shtml

  31. #31 Martin
    May 10, 2008

    Those running Octopuses are awesome. I would never have expected that.

  32. #32 James
    May 10, 2008

    It looks like a very happy red hippo with all but its head buried in the seafloor.

  33. #33 Keerax
    May 10, 2008

    Agreed James. That’s what I thought it was at first, before I took a good look at it. :D