Pharyngula

Comments

  1. #1 Russell
    April 10, 2015

    What is that little shrimp doing there? Is it about to become baby octopus food?

  2. #2 Mooney K.T
    April 10, 2015

    Wow! That is absolutely fascinating to watch. Russell I don’t think that’s an impossibility. Nature never ceases to amaze me. (15022219)

  3. #3 Antoinette van Wyk
    April 12, 2015

    That’s amazing. There seems to be hundreds of eggs hatching. How many eggs does a octopus particularly lay? How long does it take for the eggs to hatch? (15001548)

  4. #4 Mooney K.T
    April 12, 2015

    If I am correct I believe that an octopus will look after the eggs for a period of about 53 months and once the eggs hatch she dies. An octopus can lay from 150 eggs to 250000 eggs depending on the species, although octopus species that lay over 100000 eggs usually have only one or two babies that live long enough to reproduce.

  5. #5 Mooney K.T
    April 12, 2015

    15022219*

  6. #6 Emma Jepsen
    April 12, 2015

    This is so fascinating! Absolutely incredible, I could watch it over and over again. That you for the facts, K.T. Mooney, 53 months is a long time, it makes you realize how involved other species are with their young, sometimes I think as humans we tend to forget that. Laying 100000 eggs and only having a few survive, that alone makes you thankful to have such a great success rate for human reproduction.
    It would be amazing to be able to see this live!
    15074961

  7. #7 C. Leuvennink
    UP
    April 12, 2015

    I never would have imagined octopus eggs looking like that. Seeing that only a few young ones survive, I wondered how many survives and if the mother can or rather will reproduce?

  8. #8 C. Leuvennink
    April 12, 2015

    [15127754]

  9. #9 Mooney K.T
    April 12, 2015

    Personally I think it would be an interesting experience and privileged opportunity to keep an octopus, provided the conditions are correct and suitable of course. This would just expose us to how amazing these creatures are. This would give us the opportunity to observe one of the most intelligent and interactive creatures in the sea. Knowing more about these amazing animals will definitely encourage more care and concern for sea life. 15022219.

  10. #10 Odette le Roux
    April 13, 2015

    For a female octopus, becoming a mother means the beginning of end. She has to cover them and protect them against dangerous predators. She does this for the entire 53 months, never eating or leaving.

  11. #11 Refiloe (15022120)
    April 13, 2015

    It is indeed amazing how the octopus holds the record of being the animal with the longest egg-brooding period in the entire animal Kingdom! Apparently, octopus that live in shallow and warmer oceans have a shorter brooding period in comparison to those that live in deeper, colder oceans.

  12. #12 M Hertzog
    April 15, 2015

    To see a octopus guarding her babies as they are being born is amazing. It is even more amazing to know that she protects them for 53 months without eating or leaving them. But that made me wonder if she keeps protecting her after they are born. And if she does, for how long does she protect them after birth? (15044654)

  13. #13 Rebecca Marshall
    Pretoria
    April 16, 2015

    I don’t know why, but it has never occurred to me that octopi lay eggs. I suppose you learn something new everyday. What happens the the egg remains? I’m sure nature has a way of recycling them, such as them being a source of food.

  14. #14 Faith Makondo(15075232)
    pretoria
    April 16, 2015

    If octopuses can lay so much eggs all at once how do they look after them for those 53 months, because I believe that like humans looking after them can be quite handy, do these species have special ways of protecting the young ones from any kind of harm.

  15. #15 Brian Ndlovu
    South Africa, Pretoria
    April 17, 2015

    Octopus is the very unique animal from all animals i can think of. This amazing animal has four pair of arms with the mouth in the center of these arms. It surprised me to find out that actually male octopus also die few months after mating. These amazing animals can live up to five years. The female octopus before and after hatching spend too much time protecting eggs from fish and other predictors of her eggs she protect even her newly hatched octopus and does not eating, she lose strength and eventually she die. Average octopus weighs 15 kg.

  16. #16 Odette L
    April 18, 2015

    Another interesting thing to look at is he mating between the male and female octopus. Some males detach their modified arm (hectocotylus) which holds the sperm and gives it to the female to use when the eggs is already laid, others insert the arm directly into the female’s oviduct..

  17. #17 Odette L
    April 18, 2015

    u15081517

  18. #18 Odette le Roux
    April 18, 2015

    15081517

  19. #19 Ngwako
    Pretoria
    April 18, 2015

    I like this animal, It is just unique.

  20. #20 Ngwako
    April 18, 2015

    I like this animal, its just unique. 15202829

  21. #21 Jadene Jacobs (15008152)
    Pretoria
    April 19, 2015

    This is absolutely fascinating. I never knew that an octopus can lay those many eggs at once, nor was I aware of the fact that the ‘parents’ of these eggs would stay around long enough to be there when these eggs hatch (which can last anywhere from two to ten months). Apparently, the mother octopus fans currents over the eggs – like in the beginning of the video – to keep the eggs clean.

  22. #22 Bjorn Marcus
    Centurion
    April 19, 2015

    This is so interesting!

  23. #23 Keagan Hoffman
    April 19, 2015

    I never seen anything like this before. I didn’t quite understand why the female octopus would risk hurting her eggs by running her tentacles through them, but thank you for clearing that up Jadene Jacobs (15008152)

  24. #24 Pozisa-15147462
    Pretoria
    April 19, 2015

    The viedo of the octopus eggs Hatching was memorizing to watch. I was waiting for something to happen to that shrimp.

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