Communicating science

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Category archives for Communicating science

Goldacre whips it out

I told you that maybe talking real fast would be a viable lecture strategy, and here’s Ben Goldacre proving me right!

Why I hate Robin Ince

You might want to look at Ince’s web page: he’s touring in March and April, and in May he’s gathered together Brian Cox, Ben Goldacre, and Simon Singh for a “science tour celebrating the universe and many of the wonders that lie within it”. That all looks wonderful, you think, and so do I. I…

Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth

Have you got kids? Are you tangentially related to any young people? Are you young yourself? Do you know anyone who just likes a good story and interesting science? Well, then, I’m sorry, but reading this article will cost you $12.89. Jay Hosler has a new book out (illustrated by Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon),…

I don’t think journal editor L. Henry Edmunds is quite clear on how the scientific method should work: we’re supposed to have the free exchange of information. His journal recently retracted a paper (from other sources, it was apparently because the authors, um, “recycled” data from another study), and when asked why, his answer was…

Optogenetics!

The journal Nature has selected optogenetics as its “Method of the Year”, and it certainly is cool. But what really impressed me is this video, which explains the technique. It doesn’t talk down to the viewer, it doesn’t overhype, it doesn’t rely on telling you how it will cure cancer (it doesn’t), it just explains…

Science is not dead

People keep sending me this link to an article by Jonah Lehrer in the New Yorker: The Decline Effect and the Scientific Method, which has the subheadings of “The Truth Wears Off” and “Is there something wrong with the scientific method?” Some of my correspondents sound rather distraught, like they’re concerned that science is breaking…

It really isn’t that hard to learn to think scientifically — kids can do it. In a beautiful example of communicating science by doing it, students at Blackawton Primary School designed and executed an experiment in vision and learning by bees, and got it published in Biology Letters, which is making the paper available for…

Quantum atheists!

On Atheist Talk radio on Sunday morning at 9am Central time, James Kakalios will be joining the gang at Minnesota Atheists to talk about his new book, The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics: A Math-Free Exploration of the Science that Made Our World(amzn/b&n/abe/pwll). It should be very entertaining. The book looks good, although I’ve only…

How hard is that SF?

I got a request to collect participants for an online survey on science fiction — take a look and help out if you want. It’s long, and a little depressing: it’s a list of science fiction movies and TV shows, and you’re supposed to rate their scientific accuracy. I think I’m rather picky about that,…

This is really well done: Darryl Cunningham explains global warming with simple, clear illustrations and explanations. I want to steal it all, put it in a pdf, and print out a few hundred copies to hand out to the deniers.