Insects

Photo Synthesis

Category archives for Insects

Another way to humanize an insect photo…

…is to add an actual human. Dynastes granti – Western Hercules Beetle, Arizona It’s funny how our social primate brain works. We gain immediate emotional access to an image simply by inserting a member of our own species. (Incidentally, that’s one reason why David Attenborough’s Life in the Undergrowth is so effective. With Attenborough able…

Portrait of a Grasshopper

Trimerotropis pallidipennis – Pallid-Winged Grasshopper – Arizona Technical details: Lens: Canon MP-E 1-5x macro lens Body: Canon EOS 20D Flash: Canon MT-24EX twin-flash, diffused through tracing paper Settings: ISO 100, f/14, 1/250 sec

Are these two ants sharing an intimate moment?

Those of you who haven’t got an ad blocker installed have probably seen this ant floating about in a promotional banner in the ScienceBlogs sidebar: I can’t speak for how others react to this image. Most, I imagine, filter it out as yet more clutter on the screen. But for a picture of an insect…

Nature photographers William & Matthew Burrard-Lucas explain the magic behind some recent images of mosquitoes emerging from their pupae. While they list the equipment and lighting they used for the session, the key factor seems to have been the determined patience with which they watched pupae develop over two weeks so that they’d be able…

Ectatomma edentatum, Argentina Equipment details: Canon EOS 20D, using an MP-E 65mm 1-5x lens (at 5x), lit with an MT-24EX twin flash diffused through tracing paper. Several years ago, before I became serious about photography, I shot the same species in Paraguay with a little Nikon Coolpix 995. Here’s the result:

Protecting big sister

A Brazilian leafcutter ant (Atta sexdens) harvests a leaf while her little sister stands guard against an intrusive photographer. (Incidentally, image searches for this genus return an unnerving mix of terrorists and ants.) Photo details: Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens on a Canon EOS 20D. ISO 100, f/13, 1/250 sec, twin flash diffused through…

Working with Light

Compare these two images, both of the same swarm of mating ants: What’s the difference?

…these would be the beetles of choice. Onthophagus taurus dung beetles, showing size and horn variation among males. Dung beetles in the widespread genus Onthophagus sport a bewildering array of horns. Not only do the horns of different species vary in shape, size, and the body part from which they grow, many species show a…

Bark Lice.

A herd of bark lice (Psocoptera: Cerastipsocus sp.) grazes lichen across a tree trunk near C√≥rdoba, Argentina. Here’s what one of the adorable little beasties looks like up close: