Imagine Science Film Festival

Both Physics Buzz and the X-Change Files are noting the Imagine Science Film Festival starting tomorrow in New York City. As the Buzz notes:

This is only the film festival’s second year, but it’s already attracted the attention of major sponsors. Last year the journal Nature co-sponsored the festival, and this year the American Association for the Advancement of Science, publisher of rival journal Science, has taken the helm. Maybe it’s because of the festival’s unique approach to the genre of science film.

Unlike what you can expect to see on PBS NOVA or the Discovery Channel, these films aren’t out to teach a science lesson. ISFF’s founder, Alexis Gambis, says that it’s the only science film festival that doesn’t take the traditional approach.

“There are a few other science film festivals around the world, but the films they show are mostly documentaries meant for TV. They are very pedagogic,” Gambis said in an interview with New Scientist. “We’re trying to do something different.”

This sounds like a pretty cool idea. And if you’re interested in quantum physics (and why would you be reading this blog if you’re not?), the Science and Entertainment Exchange has a film for you:

That’s a mission the Science & Entertainment Exchange shares, which is why we’re sponsoring a special sneak preview of the CG-animated feature, Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey, directed by Harry Kloor and Dan St. Pierre. The screening will take place on Wednesday, October 21, 7 PM, at the CUNY Graduate Center’s Proshansky Auditorium. It’s free, although seating is limited, so reservations are required.

Quantum Quest is the story of a plucky little photon named Dave who lives in the sun and is drawn into an epic galactic battle between good and evil as the forces of the Core (protons, photons and neutrinos) face off against the antimatter forces of the Void to determine the fate of the universe.

If you’re in the New York area, and this sounds like your sort of thing, check it out.

Comments

  1. #1 Jonathan Vos Post
    October 14, 2009

    I keep pitching a biopic about Ed Witten. Finally, I’ve got it down to one paragraph what Witten did to deserve the Fields Medal, and why he’s the greatest physicist that the world at large never heard about, because it’s a harder film to make than the one about Hawking.

    The opening line of my pitch is: “A Beautiful Mind” meets ‘Primary Colors’ (1998)” — because before he was into Math/Physics, Witten did Economics, and before that was a journalist and a worker in the McGovern campaign.

  2. #2 featheredfrog
    October 14, 2009
      (and why would you be reading this blog if you’re not?)

    Umm, the pictures of SteelyKid?

  3. #3 Wilson
    October 14, 2009

    (and why would you be reading this blog if you’re not?)
    The trenchant and insightful observations on modern society?

  4. #4 Pineyman
    October 15, 2009

    The fabulous Dorky Polls?