Art

Category archives for Art

Poll: New York State of Mind

Kate has a court appearance in New York tomorrow, and we’re making a long weekend of it. I’m typing this from my parents’ house, where I’m dropping SteelyKid off for some quality time with Grandma and Grandpa, and tomorrow, I’m heading down to The City. I’ve got some meetings scheduled tomorrow afternoon, and Friday at…

Via somebody on a mailing list, Eric Whiteacre’s virtual choir: The post I got this from doesn’t contain any details, nor does it contain useful links to the making of this particular video, but looking around the top level of the blog it’s fairly clear that this was put together from a large number of…

Via Bora on FriendFeed, a cute little art project from MIT that takes a name, scans the Web for mentions of that name, and produces a color-coded bar categorizing the various mentions of that name. Here’s what you get if you put my name in: You can click on it for a bigger image, that…

Make the Hugos Better

Worldcon is less than two weeks off, which means that it’s time once again for the SF part of blogdom to explode with complaints about the quality of the nominees. There are some reasonable reactions, but it’s mostly slightly over-the-top broadsides. It’s worth emphasizing again that the source of the problem is also the solution…

After a long baby-induced delay, we are finally ready to announce the winners of the How to Teach Physics to Your Dog Caption Contest and Poetry Contest. I’ve obtained a few more copies of the bound galleys from the publisher, so we’ll be giving two awards in each contest category: one for each photo, one…

Reminder: Enter to Win My Book

Just a quick reminder post to note that you can win an advance proof copy of How to Teach Physics to Your Dog in one of two ways: By captioning pictures of the dog with physics apparatus By writing short poems about dogs and physics Regarding the last one, I’m thinking of adding a second…

In a comment to Friday’s classical music post, Chris Evo recommended a TED talk by Benjamin Zander that has the goal of convincing his audience that they love classical music: If you’re not able or inclined to watch it, he goes through a Chopin piano piece in detail, and explains how it plays off our…

One of the PDF-only studies that I complained about earlier is a hand-wringing report from the NEA on how public appreciation of art is on the decline. As summarized by Inside Higher Ed: Compared to the NEA’s 1982 survey, the steepest decline was in ballet, which that year was seen by 11.0 percent of college-educated…

The PDF Plague

There have been a half-dozen stories in the past few weeks that looked interesting, but didn’t even make it into the Links Dump for the day. Why not? Because the stories or studies were only available as PDF files. I have no idea if this is actually getting worse, but I’m finding this more irritating…

Festive Science

There’s a nice write-up about the World Science Festival in the New York Times today: The second annual World Science Festival, a five-day extravaganza of performances, debates, celebrations and demonstrations, including an all-day street fair on Sunday in Washington Square Park, began with a star-studded gala tribute to the Harvard biologist Edward O. Wilson at…