Retrospectacle: A Neuroscience Blog

Archives for November, 2007

Wiley, Wikipedia (and I) Via Newsweek

In the fair use story that just won’t die, my internet romp over the use of a figure from the Journal of Science of Food and Agriculture was mentioned in this story on Newsweek now. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, this article in The Scientist describes that incident factually. The Newsweek…

NeuroPod Podcast from Nature: SfN 2007

Didn’t go to the Society for Neuroscience conference, but still want to know what happened (and in an English accent, no less)? Then check out this new NeuroPod podcast from Nature, where Kerri Smith talks about the highlights from SFN. “Find out what computers can do for brains, find two ways to zoom in on…

Stranded on New Brainland

Looking for an unusual brain atlas for that very special neuroscientist in your life? This one is a bit non-traditional, but…wow…. By Sam Brown, 2007 The above map’s original data was created from a reference photo of a real human brain which was used to build the 3d terrain. This digital elevation model was then…

If MC Hammer Was a Scientist…

He might present this at the next meeting: And have you heard about B.E. Smalls? I hear he’s made a breakthrough: And I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the eminent Dr. Dre’s work (coauthor, Eminem): If you aren’t familiar with the Unified Theory of Everything (no, not *that* one), you might do well to…

This trend has continued until the present. Despite the NIH’s budget remaining stagnant for years, not even compensating for inflation, Bush has decided to wield the presidential veto against an increase in just $1 billion for the next fiscal year. The bill also contained new open-access legislation– a mandate for any government-funded manuscript to be…

By Dr. Sonja Pyott Department of Biology and Marine Biology University of North Carolina, Wilmington Wilmington, NC, USA Specimen: Cochlea and Hair Cells Technique: Confocal This confocal microscopy image of the organ of Corti is just stunning. Judges at the Olympus Bioscapes Digital Imaging Competition thought so too, and awarded Dr. Sonja Pyott 4th prize…

Well, apparently you make it *pink.* This is just weird. “We wanted to make sure that it was something that people were comfortable carrying and didn’t make it look like they were ‘Dirty Harry,’” said Tom Smith, the company’s co-founder and board chairman, referring to the Clint Eastwood movie. “And it does the job.” What’s…

Whoever said that you can’t learn anything useful from TV? A Harvard research team, headed by Jeff Lichtman, has duplicated the way that a television monitor uses varying amounts of just three colors (red, blue, green) to produce a huge array of resultant hues. They have applied this technique in the brain using fluorescent cyan,…

Perhaps one of the most frustrating parts of science is inadvertantly destroying the thing which you study in the pursuit of knowledge. Its unfortunate, and sometimes unavoidable, as in the case of these marine biologists who hauled an ancient ocean quahog out of Icelandic waters. The group from Bangor University in Wales was conducting a…

New Blog About Academic Interviews

The University of Michigan just started a new blog on the topic of how to handle the academic interview. What kinds of questions do you fear, and how should they be handled? How do you prepare for the interview? In general the four primary topical areas of any interview, especially early in the process, are…