Science is Culture

According to the Thomson Reuters National Science Indicators, an annual database that records the number of articles published in about 12,000 internationally recognized journals: – The Asia-Pacific region increased its global share of published science articles from 13 percent in the early 1980s to just over 30 percent in 2009 – China is leading the…

To Be a Math Teacher

Talking Open Science on Brian Lehrer

Brian Lehrer was kind enough to invite me onto his show the other day along with Kathleen Fitzpatrick of MediaCommons and Katherine Rowe, guest editor of the ground-breaking openly peer reviewed issue of Shakespeare Quarterly, to discuss digital scholarship, peer review, and open science. Our segment begins at 42:00.

Reproducible Research

Our friend Victoria Stodden is the lead author on a paper published today in Computing in Science and Engineering summarizing the recommendations of a roundtable we participated in at Yale on data (and code) sharing in (computational) science. Seed’s Joy Moore is an additional author on the paper. To adhere to the scientific method in…

From the New York Times: Now some humanities scholars have begun to challenge the monopoly that peer review has on admission to career-making journals and, as a consequence, to the charmed circle of tenured academe. They argue that in an era of digital media there is a better way to assess the quality of work.…

Journey to the Center of a Triangle

Journey to the Center of a Triangle (1976) 8m, dir. Bruce & Katharine Cornwell, presents a series of animated constructions that determine the center of a variety of triangles, including circumcenter, incenter, centroid and orthocenter. (via swissmiss)

From the New York Times The key to the Alzheimer’s project was an agreement as ambitious as its goal: not just to raise money, not just to do research on a vast scale, but also to share all the data, making every single finding public immediately, available to anyone with a computer anywhere in the…

Stephen Schneider Remembered

Stephen Schneider, a friend of Seed’s and a giant of climate science, passed away yesterday. He was 65. Stephen participated in a Seed Salon a few years ago with Laurie David. I just re-read it and found this quote: “My students are always asking, ‘Aren’t you frustrated to death? Nothing you do makes any immediate…

So

It’s summer and Seed’s running a few classic articles online. This weekend, read about “So”… The language of science, with its specialized vocabulary and clipped rhythm, has a distinctive architecture. The functional elegance of this rarefied speak is uniquely captured in one of its most inconspicuous words: “so.” This isn’t “so” the intensifier (“so expensive”);…

A Milestone for Open Science

I just read that MIT’s ground-breaking OpenCourseWare initiative passed the 2,000-course mark this month. That’s a lot of free lectures, course notes, and videos from some of the best scientific minds of the planet… First announced in 2001, MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) is an ambitious effort to share MIT’s education resources freely and openly on the…