SciencePunk

Archives for May, 2009

The European Elections are taking place this week, when millions of people will go to the polls to decide how they are represented in Europe. The European Parliament is a stage on which countless battles are played out, influencing aspects of our economy, law, judiciary, technology, environment, trade, culture, immigration, research, education, and many more.…

This entry is part of the Science and the European Election series, a collaboration between SciencePunk and the Lay Scientist blog to encourage public discussion of the science policies of the major parties standing at the forthcoming European elections. In 2007, The REACH act came into force, addressing the potential harm to humans and the…

This entry is part of the Science and the European Election series, a collaboration between SciencePunk and the Lay Scientist blog to encourage public discussion of the science policies of the major parties standing at the forthcoming European elections. It has been said that there are serious incompatibilities between member states on regulations governing stem…

This entry is part of the Science and the European Election series, a collaboration between SciencePunk and the Lay Scientist blog to encourage public discussion of the science policies of the major parties standing at the forthcoming European elections. Although the EU distributes billions in research funding, the results are often locked in pay-for-access journals.…

This entry is part of the Science and the European Election series, a collaboration between SciencePunk and the Lay Scientist blog to encourage public discussion of the science policies of the major parties standing at the forthcoming European elections. Currently the EU imports over half of its energy. Recent disputes between Russia and it neighbours…

This entry is part of the Science and the European Election series, a collaboration between SciencePunk and the Lay Scientist blog to encourage public discussion of the science policies of the major parties standing at the forthcoming European elections. Recently a ship chartered by the British offices of a Dutch petroleum company illegally dumped tonnes…

Nick Cohen has a great article in the Observer discussing the British Chiropractic Association’s legal action against science writer and producer Simon Singh: Reputable medical authorities could test the evidence and decide whether the treatments work or not. Instead of arguing before the court of informed opinion, however, the BCA went to the libel courts…

USA Today reports the curious case of a Singapore man who was detained for several hours by airport security when they couldn’t find his fingerprints. The man, who was taking capecitabine as part of chemotherapy treatment, suffered from hand-foot syndrome, a side effect of the drug where skin peels off. His oncologist describes the unusual…

How to spot a fake diamond

I quite like this guide to fakery by kickass lo-fi science site Hunkins Experiments.

Tiny cities made of crystal

Ken grows crystals. Specifically, he grows free-standing crystals made of bismuth, a metal resembling lead. It has some very interesting properties – it crystallises at right angles, and tends to form shell-like “hoppers“, and natural oxidation gives the crystals a very beautiful iridescence. The end result is something that looks like a tiny futuristic city…