SciencePunk

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It might seem odd that a book about vaginas inspired a different way to blog, but that’s the honest truth. I spend a lot of time thinking about how you might innovate when it comes to writing. It still irritates me that the overwhelming majority of the web is formatted in exactly the same way…

So you might have seen that Andrew Wakefield, the disgraced doctor who first linked the MMR vaccine to autism, has been given a “Golden Duck”  award for “lifetime achievement in quackery”.  The tweet that accompanied it in my feed asked simply “what is the purpose of this award?”, and I had to scratch my head…

I’m thrilled to be included amongst some sterling writers in the new issue of Arc magazine, Forever Alone Drone, discussing how urban exploration can act as a foil to the increasingly restrictive environment of cities. Public spaces are being sold off to private owners at an alarming rate, who can prohibit entirely legal behaviours and…

I finally got around to playing the Walking Dead videogame this weekend, and I’m already hooked. “Video game” is a bit of a misnomer really, as it’s more a piece of interactive fiction. You must guide your character, Lee Everett, through the dangers and dilemmas of a rapidly disintegrating society where the dead are returning…

Haynes Manual: Lunar Rover Edition

I quite like these spurious yet serious Haynes manuals! From the press blurb: British science writer and broadcaster Professor Chris Riley has written a book on the story of the Apollo Lunar Rover to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the vehicle’s final drive on the Moon, in December 1972. Commissioned even before the first…

The science and technology blogs were alight with adulation last week with the news that with no assistance, illiterate Ethiopian children had learned to use and even “hack” computers given to them. Speaking at  MIT Technology Review’s EmTech conference, the founder of the One Laptop Per Child initiative revealed an experiment in which Motorola Xoom tablets…

Dressed in a leather jacket and black roll neck, Daniel Libeskind holds an air of affability that complements his passionate and lucid discussion about the importance of architecture in healing and rebuilding communities.  Born into a Jewish family in Poland, he experienced life under the totalitarian Soviets before emigrating to New York, a narrative that…

          From the moment he springs onto the stage, Tomás Saraceno‘s  demeanour marks him out as an artist. Dressed in jeans and a hoodie, and wearing a scruffy beard, he stands in contrast to the parade of smartly-dressed academics that have so far made up the Falling Walls conference.  Saraceno jokes that…

Aaron Kaplan is rather in awe of being invited to the Falling Walls conference for what he calls his “hobby project”.  But not all of us can boast a hobby that connects hundreds of thousands of people to the internet in a democratic, decentralised fashion. He is the founder of Funk Feuer, a peer-to-peer mesh…

          Perhaps having anticipated some bleary eyes in the audience following last night’s reception cocktails, Google’s chief economist Hal Varian  starts his Falling Walls lecture with a question: what day of the week are the most Google searches for “hangover”? The answer is, unsurprisingly, Sunday, a fact revealed by Google’s Trends platform,…