Science To Life

Last Post

This will be the last post for Science To Life. Due to changes in my professional life I will no longer maintain the blog. I have thoroughly enjoyed writing here and I hope you have enjoyed reading the blog. Take care!

New web-based scientific tools & sites

The Graduate Junction The Graduate Junction provides an easy way for Masters, PhD and Postdoctoral researchers to see what current work is being undertaken by their peers and communicate with those who share common research interests in a global multi-disciplinary environment. It was created by a team of graduate researchers at Durham and Oxford University.…

This article was brought to my attention by the male minority (we have 2 men and 8 women) in my lab. They suggested that the article supports their plea to recruit more men into the lab in order to neutralize the excessive female-ness that they are exposed to every day. They are grossly exaggerating, of…

The Southeastern United States has long been recognized for producing talented scientists and technicians. But are too many of them leaving the Southeast to find jobs? I recently explored this issue in an article that was published in the August 2008 edition of Tech Journal South. Georgia, North Carolina and Florida were selected as representative…

I recently read an interesting article about why doing scientific research makes a person feel stupid and why this may actually be a good thing. The article is written by Martin A. Schwartz, a professor at the University of Virginia and is published in the April 2008 edition of Journal of Cell Science. Schwartz writes:…

You may soon be enjoying microwave popcorn and other ‘nuked’ foods and beverages faster than ever before, while saving on electricity. Researchers in Pennsylvania and Japan report development of new ceramic materials that heat up faster and retain heat longer than conventional microwave cookware while using less energy. The ceramics are made from a mixtures…

After 6 years in graduate school, I finally defended my dissertation and earned those 3 letters I’ve wanted for so long: P.h. & D. I look forward to putting the emotional and psychological roller coaster called “grad school” behind me and moving on into the professional world, which I hope will be more routinely stable.…

Blogroll Picks

Here are some interesting posts from bloggers in my Blogroll: 1. Counter Minds tackles the question “why do people have different blood types?” 2. Bio Job Blog writes about being involved in the creation of a new science-oriented social networking site called “The BioCrowd”. 3. The Gist writes about scientists’ efforts to study the melting…

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the major cause of death in infants between 1 month and 1 year of age in developed countries (1). Researchers of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Monterotondo, Italy, have developed a mouse model of SIDS to study to role of serotonin signaling in the disease and hope…

I am happy to report that my research paper on a protein implicated in breast and lung cancer, called BAP1 (BRCA1-associated protein-1), was recently accepted for publication in the journal ‘Cancer Research’. As you know, my research studies are in the field of cancer biochemistry and for the past few years I have been working…