Sciencewomen

Sadness, Peace and Joy

When I began to blog almost 5 years ago, I wanted to share stories of my graduate school experience with other women scientists in the hopes that we could form a virtual support network for each other. Back then it took me weeks to find even one other woman doing the same thing with a…

Hanging up my blogging shoes

You might have guessed this was coming. My blogging frequency has dropped off dramatically this year, particularly this semester. I keep writing “yep, I haven’t died yet – I’ll tell you all about what I’m doing sometime, really” posts, and not ever following up. Other signs have included….

Two books and a blog for your future perusal

One of my colleagues Amy Slaton (a historian of engineering and engineering education at Drexel) has started a new blog in conjunction with the completion of her new book, Race, Rigor and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line. Her work is brilliant — thoughtful, grounded, clear, and with an appalling…

My year of travel

Okay. It’s been another month since I blogged. But since I last wrote, my dad wrote the family holiday letter and asked me how many places I’ve traveled to. Here’s the list. January To Detroit to look at the SWE Archives To RTP for ScienceOnline2009 February To Arizona, invited to a workshop on engineering and…

On December 6, 1989, an armed gunman named Marc Lepine entered an engineering classroom at Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal, Quebec. He demanded all 48 men in the class leave the room, lined up all 9 women against a wall, and, shouting “You are all a bunch of [expletive] feminists!”, proceeded to shoot them. He went…

SciWo’s Storytime: Bear Scouts

Gosh it’s a difficult time of year, when the desire to frolic outdoors in the late fall/early winter chill is tempered by the mountains of papers to grade, endless meetings to be held, and the lurking danger of syllabi for next semester. It’s the time of year, when you have every intention of taking dog…

Inadwrimo is over, but the work never ends.

I did a not-so-stellar job of meeting my not-so-stellar goals for writing and research in November, but I did get some stuff done. Done! Accepted!!!!! Finish revisions on the paper-that-won’t-die (goal: November 13) Done! Internal release time application (due November 18) Read some, but not nearly enough. Read around proposed grad student topics enough to…

This week we are reading Judith Viorst’s Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. This video was produced with a dedication to Kate, who explained to me why kids like this book so much even before they understand everything that’s happening in it. She wisely told me that it’s because kids rarely…

I am not in charge of SciWo’s Storytime. Sure, it might look like I’m the one reading the books and operating the video camera, but Minnow exerts the ultimate executive authority as editor-in-chief. Some weeks no videos whatsoever are allowed to be made, some weeks she’s content to let me pick the book, and some…

Recently I had the opportunity to attend a talk by Gail Cassell, a member of the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine, and one of the authors of the NAS report Rising Above the Gathering Storm. Dr. Cassell is currently Vice President of Infectious Diseases for Eli Lilly. She was previously the chair of the Department…