Sciencewomen

Archives for February, 2009

Reflections on turning thirty

As Alice kindly announced, today is my 30th birthday. The day got off to a rough start, but a little time ignoring work, eating a lovely organic lunch, reading some Pride and Prejudice, and then eating too much ice cream has turned the day into quite a lovely experience. Anyways, before my natal day expires,…

Happy birthday, ScienceWoman!

Haaaappy birrrrthdaaaay tooo yoooooou, Haaaaappy birrrrthdaaaay toooo yooooou, Haaaappy birrrrrrrthdaaaaay, deeeeear Sciiiiience Womaaaaan, Haaaaaappy birrrrthdaaaaaay toooo yoooooooou! (Aaaand many moooooooore!)

What are you good at? (Part II)

Wow. You all rock. You are good at so many wonderful things – I am impressed. Yesterday’s question was prompted by the introductory activity at a COACh workshop that I had the privilege of attending. The workshop focused on developing the negotiating skills of women in STEM, and I highly recommend it and the other…

Creating a culture of collegiality

So here I am in sunny and unsustainable Tempe, enjoying the warm weather and empty morning (the workshop I’m here to attend doesn’t start until 1:30 local time). I spent this morning sleeping in (gasp!), chatting to my mom on iChat, calling a friend whose birthday it is (Hi, Sarah!), and — even more shockingly…

My office door

Sorry for my blog silence — I’ve been swamped in work, and then to top it off, I got sick yesterday and missed a day of work (!). I’m heading to Arizona State University today to go to a workshop on engineering ethics, and to visit my sister-in-law and her family, so the blogging silence…

What are you good at?

You are in a room with a bunch of other female faculty/post-docs/grad students from your university. You know a few of them, but most of them are unfamiliar to you. The convener of the meeting asks each of you to introduce yourself by answering the following question: “What is one aspect of your professional life…

Hear ye, hear ye. The first-ever and best-ever edition of the Diversity in Science Carnival has been posted.Read all about it at DNLee’s Urban Science Adventures! There’s some really fabulous stuff there and I can’t wait to read those that I missed when they were first posted. While you’re being inspired by all of the…

Problems with pacing in a large lecture course

Scene 1: a few days ago (SW notes that most pencils in the room have stopped moving or have slowed down) SW: OK, so moving on, we see … (flipping to next slide) (A hand goes up near the back of the auditorium) SW: Yes? Did you have a question? Stu Dent 1: Could you…

A book meme to start the week

BBC Book Meme As seen everywhere. BBC Book List Apparently the BBC reckons most people will have only read 6 of the 100 books here. Instructions: 1) Look at the list and put an ‘x’ after those you have read. (I’ll bold those I’ve read and italicize those of which I only read part.) 2)…

Dr. Ashanti Pyrtle is an assistant professor in the College of Marine Science at the University of South Florida. She’s a chemical oceanographer who studies the fate, transport and retention of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems. Her PhD work investigated the marine distribution of radioisotopes from the Chernobyl accident, and she’s currently doing work in Puerto…