Sciencewomen

For Posterity

i-9dc84d4d9156dccb30d5f62466b4219a-swblocks.jpg(to the tune of “Hush, little baby”)

Speak little child, and make lots of sounds
And keep growing in leaps and bounds
We’ll be busy as bumblebees
We’ll catch the waves that crash on the seas
We’ll go for strolls and walks in the park
We’ll draw lots of sidewalk art
We’ll run through sprinklers on days when it’s hot
We’ll sing songs and laugh a lot
We’ll climb a mountain to touch the sky
We’ll bake you a blueberry pie
I’d give you the stars above
For you are my one true love.

These days Minnow would rather have a story at bedtime than a lullaby, but this lullaby was sung multiple times daily from age 6 weeks to about 1.5 years. The original words were simply too materialistic for my taste, but the tune was simple and appealing. And I’m happy to report that we’ve already done many of the things in the song.

I love you, Minnow.

Comments

  1. #1 Mrs. CH
    June 10, 2009

    Love it – that made my heart melt!

  2. #2 JessSnark
    June 10, 2009

    I love this! It’s so sweet.

  3. #3 ScienceMama
    June 10, 2009

    I LOVE it and I’m totally stealing it.

  4. #4 Zuska
    June 10, 2009

    What a beautiful reworking of that song! You are such a good mama.

  5. #5 Lab Lemming
    June 11, 2009

    Dear Sciencewoman,
    That is very sweet, and you are an excellent mother.
    However, I would advise against handing out stars to your child.

    Stars are gigantic radiating unshielded nuclear explosions. Like plastic bags, they are not suitable for children under three. While older children can generally manage their white-hot temperature, ionizing radiation, and incredible magnetic and gravitational fields, even 8 and 9-year-olds should be supervised when playing with stellar-sized thermonuclear gas balls. After all, you wouldn’t want Minnow putting one in her mouth without blowing on it first to cool it off…