diversity matters

Sciencewomen

Category archives for diversity matters

Two books and a blog for your future perusal

One of my colleagues Amy Slaton (a historian of engineering and engineering education at Drexel) has started a new blog in conjunction with the completion of her new book, Race, Rigor and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line. Her work is brilliant — thoughtful, grounded, clear, and with an appalling…

What would you do?

A few days ago I arrived at my office in the morning and was greeted with an unpleasant surprise…someone had scratched a cross into the bulletin board just outside my office door. (Apologies for the terrible cell-phone picture.) While I’m able to cover the image with a strategically placed advising schedule, I’m haunted by a…

After tropical forests are cleared for agriculture and then abandoned, secondary forests regrow on the site. But how do plant species composition, biomass and soil organic matter differ through this succession of primary forest, pasture, and secondary forest? Employing tools of biogeochemistry, ecosystem ecology, and land-use/land-cover change to examine those and related questions, Erika Marin-Spiotta…

Reader science newbie poses a great question to me and asks for the collective wisdom of our readers: Dear Sciencewoman, I have been reading & loving you blog for some time now. Thanks! You rock! Ok, I have a question…. I have interviewed for, and been given a verbal offer for my first assistant professor…

JAM redux: a summary

Okay, so I have recovered from my visit to Washington, and my first JAM conference. Here are some highlights that are more edited than my lame live-blogging post is.

My university has reported that we have just increased our math requirements for admissions into the university. I guess that Purdue’s requirements had been to require students have taken 3 years of math to be admitted, and now it will be 4 years starting in Fall 2011. The argument is that “[t]he vast majority –…

Sunday night seductions

Liberal Arts Lady has ably hosted another fantastic edition of Scientiae. Head over there for some fantastic stories of role models and mentors, as well as some reminders that we have a ways to go before all aspiring scientists can find someone who looks like them. I also wanted to draw your attention to an…

Hear ye, hear ye. The first-ever and best-ever edition of the Diversity in Science Carnival has been posted.Read all about it at DNLee’s Urban Science Adventures! There’s some really fabulous stuff there and I can’t wait to read those that I missed when they were first posted. While you’re being inspired by all of the…

Dr. Ashanti Pyrtle is an assistant professor in the College of Marine Science at the University of South Florida. She’s a chemical oceanographer who studies the fate, transport and retention of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems. Her PhD work investigated the marine distribution of radioisotopes from the Chernobyl accident, and she’s currently doing work in Puerto…

I recently got an email from a colleague, Rebecca Hartman-Baker, who works at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the National Center for Computational Sciences, and who would like some thoughts from you all on the following questions and context: A colleague and I are holding a Birds of a Feather session (BoF) at the Richard…