in the news

Sciencewomen

Category archives for in the news

I’m back. In person, and online. And not all that thrilled about it, but I’ll cope. I’ll regale you with updates on our fab trip out west, and on how my fall is shaking out, including teaching and research plans, but I first have to finish reading a dissertation that is being defended tomorrow, and…

Is a mother in labor a child abuser?

If she lives in New Jersey, she might be. Because apparently, refusing a C-section (and then successfully vaginally delivering a healthy baby) and acting “combative” “erratic” and “noncompliant” during labor is considered child abuse and neglect and is grounds for the New Jersey Division of Youth and Family Services (NJ DYFS) to immediately take away…

Silence is the Enemy: In my backyard

Recall that for the month of June, a group of bloggers are trying to draw attention to the horror of violence against women and girls across the globe. Along this theme, I could write about sex tourism in Mombasa (a direct result of increased regulations in Cambodia) or the conversations about legalising sex work so…

The New York Times Lens blog is regularly fascinating, especially to a wannabe photographer. Did you see the post on the Tiananmen Square “man and tank” photo? There’s also incredible photos from the protests of the election in Iran. This week, the Lens blog as part of the Second Chances series, tells the story of…

Blog friend Pat Campbell and her colleagues Susan Metz, and Jennifer Weisman gave a great talk at JAM on getting your research message out to the press.

A friend of my dad, Paul Robinson, who is also a professor here at Purdue, has just reported that he has successfully climbed Mt Everest to raise awareness and funds for a cheap, low-tech diagnostic test he is developing to diagnose HIV/AIDS. Read his blog here, and about his preparation here. Even better — donate…

Cornelia Dean at the New York Times reports on a new report by National Research Council on the status of women faculty in STEM fields. I haven’t read it yet (just ordered a copy), but Dean reports one particular item of note, “The panel said one factor outshined all others in encouraging women to apply…

The perils of PhDs

ScienceGrandma pointed me to this recent article in the Wall Street Journal. It’s titled “So You Want to Be a Professor?” but I think it should have been called “The Perils of a Ph.D.” The article begins by citing some examples of graduate schools that are reducing admissions of PhD applicants for next year, in…

There’s an article on the New York Times Online about Allannah Thomas, founder of Helicon, a non-profit that helps low-income women learn math skills they need for better jobs. Thomas’s courses are called “math boot camp” because of their focus on fundamental skills, and she works with women to help them develop those skills you…

Senators blocking Obama science picks

President Obama’s picks for science advisor (John Holdren) and NOAA administrator (Jane Lubchenco) are being blocked from receiving confirmation because of the anonymous holds of one or more Senators. Mike Dunford at The Questionable Authority has been following the story for at least a week and writes today that: As I’ve already said – possibly…