teaching

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Category archives for teaching

Remember this summer when I was working on the course design for my new prep on Experimental Design and Data Analysis? We’re now a month into the class, and while it has had its rough moments, I think it will ultimately be quite useful to the students enrolled in it. I’m currently avoiding grading, so…

I’m back to working on my class on Experimental Design and Data Analysis. One of my goals for the course is to have students work in groups to write an NSF-style proposal. So I sat down this morning to think about the steps it takes to write a research proposal. When I turned to google,…

To recap, I’m prepping a new graduate level course on experimental design and data analysis (EDDA) that will serve MS and PhD students from geosciences and civil and environmental engineering. I’ve been working through the SERC course design tutorial, and so far I’ve figured out context and constraints, over-arching goals, and ancillary skills goals. It’s…

Now that things at ScienceBlogs have returned to normal, and I’ve drawn down my stash of reader emails, it’s time to get back to work on my series on course design. For those who haven’t been playing along (1.1, 1.2) I’m prepping a new graduate level course on experimental design and data analysis (EDDA) that…

As introduced yesterday, I’m blogging my way through the SERC tutorial on course design, for a new graduate-only course on experimental design and data analysis. Yesterday, I explained the context and constraints on the course, and today I’m mulling on the course goals. I’m supposed to identify 1-3 over-arching goals for the course and 1-2…

After articulating that my most dire need is to get funded, it may seem disjointed to embark on a series of blog posts about teaching, but there you have it, the life of a professor at a place that requires both research and teaching. I still contend that I will get fired from my job…

In praise of NASA’s Earth Observatory

Let me now sing the praises of NASA’s Earth Observatory, a phenomenal web-based public education resource that is celebrating its 10th birthday today. Every day for the past decade, NASA has been uploading spectacular remote sensing images and astronaut photographs and accompanying them with clearly written, jargon-free but scientifically accurate explanations of the pictured phenomena.…

This is not a belated April Fool’s joke, though I’ll admit to having sat on this since Wednesday so that my readers wouldn’t think I was making this up. Here is the correspondence I found in my email account on Wednesday morning: Hi! I’ve been reading your blog now for the past 18 months- and…

Let me start by saying that I love my upper-level undergraduate students. They are engaged, enthusiastic, willing to try anything, hard-working, and asking great questions. I have near perfect attendance in my class, and when a student misses class, I usually hear a pretty legitimate excuse, often with documentation. Our students have complicated lives. But…

Problems with pacing in a large lecture course

Scene 1: a few days ago (SW notes that most pencils in the room have stopped moving or have slowed down) SW: OK, so moving on, we see … (flipping to next slide) (A hand goes up near the back of the auditorium) SW: Yes? Did you have a question? Stu Dent 1: Could you…