The Scientific Activist

Archives for June, 2006

Via Evolving Thoughts comes news that the Public Library of Science (PLoS) is starting a series of blogs to promote its recently announced interdisciplinary PLoS ONE journal. PLoS publishes several prestigious open access scientific journals and is now taking things a step further with a new journal that will, among other things, “empower the scientific…

I see that Janet Stemwedel of Adventures in Ethics and Science recently republished an interesting series of posts on animal rights and scientific ethics that originally came out around the same time I was writing about my experience at an animal rights protest. In light of that, we’ll keep this discussion going with the following…

Here’s another post from the old site. Since I’ve been writing quite a bit lately about Pro-Test and the response of Oxford scientists to animal rights extremism, it’s important to understand why the current movement is significant, in light of what scientists in Oxford have been facing over the last few years. This post, which…

Although Steinn Sigurdsson of Dynamics of Cats beat me to this one, I still thought I would chime in. The Guardian reports today that is was recently able to purchase a 78-nucleotide sequence of DNA based on the small pox genome and that it was able to get the supplier to mail it to a…

“Ph.D. programs don’t really attract the most exceptional students,” he said. I was having dinner with a few professors and graduate students from the Oxford Department of Biochemistry last night when one of the professors made that assertion. The topic of conversation was why so many graduate students in our program seem to lack a…

To My Esteemed Critics

Here at The Scientific Activist, we welcome criticism–intelligent criticism, that is (as opposed to unintelligible dribble like this). Besides, when it comes to boosting traffic stats, any link is a good link, so I thought I should give a shout out to some of the nice folks who linked to me over the last couple…

It looks like it’s going to be a pretty busy day for me, so here’s a post from the archives. I picked this one because it’s still very timely (the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2006 is still in committee in the Senate) and it’s related to my recent post on open peer review.…

NASA Admits Censorship Occurred

The Bad Astronomy Blog reports that NASA has officially admitted that censorship did in fact take place there recently. In a letter to Senator Joe Lieberman (D-CT), NASA writes: …an internal inquiry has revealed that one recent media request to interview Dr. James Hansen, of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, was inappropriately declined. This…

Each week, Seed magazine poses a question to all of its ScienceBloggers. This week’s question, from reader Jake Bryan, is: Assuming that time and money were not obstacles, what area of scientific research, outside of your own discipline, would you most like to explore? Why? My current work is in protein structure, but there are…

I bring of the subject of political interference in science so much that I’m starting to sound like a broken record. By this point, it’s pretty much a topic that needs no introduction around here, so we’ll just dive right in. In the ongoing struggle against political interference Michael Stebbins of Sex Drugs & DNA…