The Scientific Activist

Archives for October, 2007

If so, you’ll be interested in today’s announcement from BPR3 (Bloggers for Peer-Reviewed Research Reporting): We’re pleased to announce that BPR3′s Blogging on Peer Reviewed Research icons are now ready to go! Anyone can use these icons to show when they’re making a serious post about peer-reviewed research, rather than just linking to a news…

On November 6th (and now during early voting) Texans have the chance to vote on a variety of amendments to the Texas Constitution. One of these is Proposition 15: The constitutional amendment requiring the creation of the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas and authorizing the issuance of up to $3 billion in bonds…

A Choice We Shouldn’t Have to Make

On Monday, Mike the Mad Biologist posted about the sheer idiocy of “choice-based health care,” which seems to be so en vogue today in the Republican party and elsewhere. He writes: One of the most ridiculous ideas to come down the pike is the notion that most people, who are woefully ignorant of medicine and…

A few years ago, while I simultaneously enjoyed a mild Texas evening and a few beers with a second-year medical student, my idealistic and outspoken friend argued that as a society we spend way too much money on scientific research. That money should instead, she contended, be spent wholly and directly on fighting global poverty…

Along with thousands of other bloggers, I’m observing the inaugural Blog Action Day by blogging about the environment today. We heard some good news out of California on Saturday. Going against pressure from his own party and particularly from the National Rifle Association (NRA), governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed into law AB 821 (the Ridley-Tree Condor…

Tomorrow, 15 October, is the inaugural Blog Action Day. This means that thousands of bloggers from across the internet will publish posts on a single topic: the environment. So far over 14,000 blogs have signed up, with an estimated audience of over 12,000,000 readers. And, especially considering the outcome of the Nobel Peace Prize last…

Robert May on the State of UK Science

Recently I came across a Nature commentary article (subscription required) by Robert May, former president of the Royal Society. Published in June of this year, May’s article commented on the state of UK science as the government transitioned from the leadership of Tony Blair to Gordon Brown. As I read it I couldn’t help but…

Anyone who has lived outside of the United States or practiced science for a significant amount of time can vouch for the wonder that is the metric system. However, since an unfortunate majority of Americans do not fit this description, we’re subject to outbursts like these: NO, on celsius. This is the United States of…

The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was announced this morning, and it will be shared equally between Al Gore and the IPCC. It was widely anticipated that Al Gore would be this year’s honoree. The IPCC was less expected, although it is certainly at least as–if not more–deserving of the honor. Here’s what the Nobel Committee…

We’re one week into the DonorsChoose Bloggers Challenge, and we’re already off to a great start. Thanks to some generous donations, we’ve already (as of the publishing of this post) raised $295 here at The Scientific Activist (30% of our $1,000 goal). Even more impressively, the participants at ScienceBlogs have together raised over $12,500. And,…