The Scientific Activist

Archives for September, 2008

On Saturday, 20 September, Mo Costandi (Neurophilosophy), Selvakumar Ganesan (The Scientific Indian), Kara Contreary (Pure Pedantry), and I hosted a gathering at the Calthorpe Arms in London to join others in celebrating ScienceBlogs’ one millionth reader comment. In addition to footing the bill for the drinks, ScienceBlogs also sent each party a nifty little Flip…

Obama Endorsed by 61 Nobel Laureates

Yesterday, the Obama campaign released a letter of endorsement signed by 61 Nobel Laureates (click here for a nicer looking pdf). Michael Stebbins of Scientists and Engineers for America points out that “this is the largest number of Nobel Laureates to ever endorse a candidate for office.” And, why should we be surprised? Obama’s answers…

Nature Makes a Funny

Yes, these are really the front and back covers of this week’s issue of Nature. Really. The dog on the left looks so hopeful. The dog on the right… confused. On a more serious note, Nature does have a full section on the upcoming election, including Obama’s answers to some science-related questions (McCain declined to…

Since our paper on the role of blogs in academia was published earlier this week, we’ve received quite a bit of feedback from the across blogosphere. Befittingly, the authors of the paper have contributed to this, as Tara gave her thoughts on her blog, I gave mine on my blog (Shelley has been busy traveling…

Earlier today, Elias Zerhouni–who has been the director of the NIH since 2002–announced that he will resign at the end of this October. According to the NIH press release, he is stepping down “to pursue writing projects and explore other professional opportunities.” The Hill has more from Zerhouni about his resignation: “I felt it would…

Yesterday, I blogged about the paper that Shelley Batts, Tara Smith, and I just published in PLoS Biology on integrating blogging into academia. As promised, we have a very long list of people we would like to acknowledge for their contributions to this work. As I noted yesterday, this paper was built upon the anecdotes,…

Just over a year ago, I joined fellow science bloggers Shelley Batts (Of Two Minds) and Tara Smith (Aetiology) in setting out to catalogue the accomplishments–and pitfalls–of the scientific blogosphere and to explain why people should pay attention. In a sense, we wanted to say “We are the science bloggers; hear us roar!” And, in…

As ScienceBlogs prepares to receive its one millionth reader comment, ScienceBloggers are planning parties around the globe in celebration of the event. For our readers in London, Mo Costandi (Neurophilosophy), Ed Yong (Not Exactly Rocket Science), Selvakumar Ganesan (The Scientific Indian), Kara Contreary (Pure Pedantry), and I have planned a party on Saturday, 20 September.…

Do You Work on E. Coli?

If so, you should check out EcoliWiki, which you might find a useful resource, and you might even find yourself compelled to contribute some of your knowledge to it. Since I’m already blogging about E. coli today, I thought I would also bring up an interesting project I found out about earlier this week. I’m…

E. coli, We Hardly Knew You

Microcosm: E. Coli and the New Science of Life by Carl Zimmer Pantheon: 2008, 256 pages. Buy now! (Amazon) I come face-to-face with Escherichia coli every day. In a sense, we all do–as billions of E. coli inhabit every individual’s intestines. But for me, E. coli is a protein factory. I’m a structural biologist, and…