Fantastical Fridays

The Scientific Activist

Category archives for Fantastical Fridays

Fantastical Fridays Going on Hiatus

The Scientific Activist will be taking a break from Fantastical Fridays for a while, starting with last week. (Yes, I know, this post is a little late). Things have been pretty busy in the lab lately and that, combined with the fact that I haven’t had home internet access for over a month (until two…

…Or at least that’s the impression that college freshmen with US Department of Education Smart Grants are getting, the The Chronicle of Higher Education reported Tuesday: Like a gap in the fossil record, evolutionary biology is missing from a list of majors that the U.S. Department of Education has deemed eligible for a new federal…

It has been known officially since 2002 that the sciences are hard, and, as much as we scientists love it when our friends and family tell us how smart and wonderful we must be since they could never understand what we do… is this elevated position going to cost us in the end? Big time?…

This week’s installment of Fantastical Fridays discusses a not-so-impressive finding reported in the media in January 2006. From the archives: (30 January 2006) To all of those who worried about the United States’ dependence on Middle Eastern oil, who tried to raise awareness about dwindling global oil reserves, or who fought for decent fuel economy…

With a name like Ready.gov, the Department of Homeland Security’s emergency preparedness website isn’t particularly modest about its objectives. However, the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) claims that the site isn’t living up to its mission. Instead of just complaining about it, though, FAS has put its money where its mouth is: it made its…

From the archives: (19 March 2006) Genetic engineering holds a great deal of promise, from potentially curing a variety of human ailments to addressing nutritional deficiencies through transgenic crops. One project even aims to engineer into bacteria the ability to generate a variety of alternative fuels. When it comes to genetic engineering and its emerging…

This post from the archives describes a recent research finding that may be welcome news for some…. (24 May 2006) If you know what I’m talking about, and if you are in fact “cool”, then you might also be interested in the findings presented Tuesday by Dr. Donald Tashkin and his coauthors at an American…

Although a given scientific paper probably has at least something fairly interesting or unique about it, most people aren’t going to be too interested in reading about, for example, the structural details of the protein-protein interactions between cytoplasmic integrin tails and focal adhesion-associated proteins (my work). But this paper… man, this is completely different. Not…

Since all of my Fantastical Fridays posts so far have been about chemistry or physics, I think it’s time for a change of pace. Here’s a post I wrote a couple of months ago about some more “political” science that had been in the news. (24 January 2006) Now I have an excuse for my…

There are a number of approaches scientists take to get at the fundamental nature of life, and one of those is elucidating the chemical structures of the molecules that make life happen, particularly proteins, which are the workhorses of the cell. One of the two primary methods for determining these structures is nuclear magnetic resonance…