open access

The Scientific Activist

Category archives for open access

Another Reason to Consider Open Access

Jim Hu gives us another reason for scientists to consider publishing in open access journals: Sometimes I’d like to view your papers while I’m off campus and at a study section. Of course, if you’re one of my grants, I have already accessed your paper from home. But if I can’t access the paper from…

…apparently involves reposting others’ blog posts without permission or proper attribution. I’m being facetious here, of course, but it is quite ironic that Mike Dunford of The Questionable Authority just caught anti-open-access warrior Elsevier copying the majority of one of his blog posts and posting it on a freely available site without attribution to him…

Via A Blog Around the Clock comes news that the Senate will be voting on mandatory public access to NIH research later this month (on September 28, apparently). Such a bill has already passed the House (in July 2007). The Alliance for Taxpayer Access is urging citizens to contact their Senators in support of this…

This is about the only appropriate response to the absurdity of the the anti-open access organization PRISM. A commenter on the last post pointed me to PISD, the Partnership for Integrity in Scientific Dis-semination: The Partnership for Integrity in Scientific Dis-semination was established by a concerned group of biomedical scientists to combat the steady encroachment…

Now That Is One Ugly PRISM

This is all over the blogosphere already, but since I occasionally blog about open access issues, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the controversy over a new anti-open access organization called PRISM. The go-to post on this topic is at A Blog Around the Clock, where Bora is collecting reactions from around the…

In my post earlier today, I stressed the need for the NIH to mandate open access to research publications supported by its funding: As the largest supporter of biomedical research in the US, the NIH has a special obligation to make sure that its (taxpayer funded!) research is published in the public domain. Since May…

General Thoughts on the NIH

I’ve been tagged by Hope for Pandora (who was tagged by DrugMonkey, who was tagged by Writedit) in a blog meme regarding the NIH’s request for feedback on its peer review system. I’m not huge into these blog memes, so I’m not going to pass this along to seven others, but I will share a…

Ah, So That’s How They Did It!

Anyone who has tried to replicate an experiment based on the description published in a paper knows that this can be difficult, frustrating, and often close to impossible. The protocols in the Methods section can be incomplete, even inaccurate, and sometimes lead the hopeful reader down a trail of never-ending references to previous papers, eventually…

According to this week’s Science magazine, there’s some good news and some bad news regarding open access publishing. Which do you want first? The bad news? OK, here goes. According to a letter (free access via Sex Drugs & DNA) authored by Michael Stebbins, Erica Davis, Lucas Royland, and Gartrell White (mostly of the Federation…

Today’s issue of Nature includes a particularly damning news story about the financial troubles facing the Public Library of Science, a publisher of several prestigious open access journals. In the article, Nature describes PLoS’s difficulties and heavily stresses its continued reliance on philanthropic grants.