Oxford

The Scientific Activist

Category archives for Oxford

In the op-ed pages of The Washington Post today, Elliot Gerson–the American Secretary of the Rhodes Trust–takes a bold stand: Tonight, 32 young Americans will win Rhodes Scholarships. Their tenures at Oxford are funded by the legacy of the British imperialist Cecil Rhodes, a man whose life would not be honored today were it not…

Today, a court in Oxford found animal rights extremist Mel Broughton guilty of conspiracy to commit arson and sentenced him to ten years in prison for his crime. Broughton was arrested in 2007, after being linked to a failed arson attempt at Oxford’s Templeton College (which followed a successful attack of Queen’s College the previous…

Last fall, most of the Oxford Biochemistry Department moved into a fancy-schmancy new building (imaginatively named “New Biochemistry”). A few of us stayed behind (have you ever tried to move a 6-magnet NMR facility?), and–to be totally honest–I can’t say that I’m too disappointed about this. Granted, the new building is notable enough to warrant…

Last Friday the British Minister of Science, Paul Drayson, visited the science area of Oxford University to give a short speech and take questions. The audience was a fairly random assortment of a couple of hundred academics and students, mostly from the sciences. I was invited to fill one of ten graduate student slots granted…

The Future of the Internet

This evening, I was watching The Colbert Report–a show that, along with The Daily Show, I’ve been enjoying much more frequently lately since they began posting full (free and internationally-available) episodes online–and I stumbled across this interview from last night’s show with Jonathan Zittrain, a professor of internet law at Oxford:

Science for a Brave New World

On Monday, I attended an interesting lecture sponsored by the 21st Century School here in Oxford entitled “What Is Science For?”. You can see a discussion on the event here and read a pdf summary of it here. The lecture was co-presented by scientist John Sulston and philosopher John Harris, and it was introduced by…

When I first arrived in Oxford, about two and a half years ago, I found myself face to face with a very vocal and determined animal rights movement. Thriving on misinformation and intimidation–through their visible rallies and underhanded techniques of arson, grave robbing, and constant threats–they had stalled construction on Oxford’s new animal research building…

Pro-Test March this Saturday

Pro-Test, Oxford’s pro-animal research organization, will be holding its third major public demonstration this Saturday, 9 February: 09.02.08: Pro-test marching on two year anniversary On Saturday 9th February 2008 Pro-Test will march for a third time in support of animal research. We march to: Defend – the rights of researchers to work in peace Celebrate…

The Democratic Party is doing the very cool thing this year of giving Americans living abroad their own delegation to the 2008 Democratic Convention. This means that anyone currently living outside of the US can vote in the Democratic Presidential Primary for their own 11 delegates. Voting will take place online from February 5-12 and…

An individual cell inside the human body is in a dynamic environment: it not only has to anchor itself to its surroundings but also be able to communicate with them and respond as appropriate. One group of proteins–the integrins–play a central role in all of these tasks. The integrins are large (about 200,000 Da) membrane-spanning…