science policy

The Scientific Activist

Category archives for science policy

Science for a Brave New World

On Monday, I attended an interesting lecture sponsored by the 21st Century School here in Oxford entitled “What Is Science For?”. You can see a discussion on the event here and read a pdf summary of it here. The lecture was co-presented by scientist John Sulston and philosopher John Harris, and it was introduced by…

Last Thursday (April 24), the Senate unanimously passed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA, H.R. 493) in a landmark vote. The goal of this bill is “to prohibit discrimination on the basis of genetic information with respect to health insurance and employment,” and it therefore would help fill this gaping hole that exists…

Via the ABC News blog Political Punch comes news that senator and Republican presidential candidate John McCain has taken a strong stance on the discredited link between vaccination and autism… a stance contrary to scientific consensus. Here’s what Jake Tapper wrote: At a town hall meeting Friday in Texas, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., declared that…

Science Debate 2008 Is Gaining Steam

Since the movement for an official presidential debate focused on science was launched in December 2007, Science Debate 2008 has gained momentum continuously. For evidence of this, just check out its news page, or take a look at the long lists of influential organizations and individuals, bloggers, and signatories in general supporting this initiative. And,…

As the 2008 elections swing into full gear, Scientists and Engineers for America (SEA) today launched a new resource–the Science, Health And Related Policies (SHARP) Network–which allows you to track how various elected officials and candidates stack up on a variety of science and health policy issues. SEA was formed a couple of months before…

Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum of The Intersection (along with Derek Araujo, Matthew Chapman, Austin Dacey, Lawrence Krauss, Shawn Lawrence Otto, and John Rennie) are spearheading a grassroots movement called Sciencedebate 2008 to try to convince the powers that be of the need for a presidential debate on science in 2008. For a comprehensive list…

On November 6th (and now during early voting) Texans have the chance to vote on a variety of amendments to the Texas Constitution. One of these is Proposition 15: The constitutional amendment requiring the creation of the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas and authorizing the issuance of up to $3 billion in bonds…

Robert May on the State of UK Science

Recently I came across a Nature commentary article (subscription required) by Robert May, former president of the Royal Society. Published in June of this year, May’s article commented on the state of UK science as the government transitioned from the leadership of Tony Blair to Gordon Brown. As I read it I couldn’t help but…

Via A Blog Around the Clock comes news that the Senate will be voting on mandatory public access to NIH research later this month (on September 28, apparently). Such a bill has already passed the House (in July 2007). The Alliance for Taxpayer Access is urging citizens to contact their Senators in support of this…

Or, at least that’s what I thought when I read this article from Saturday’s Guardian: Universities and medical schools have been criticised for increasing the number of animals used in research by more than 50% since 1996 while industry has reduced its procedures by 20% over the same period. Campaigners say that a cultural inertia…