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The Scientific Activist

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The second paper from my undergraduate work at Texas A&M University was recently published in Molecular Cancer. The abstract can be found here, and the pdf of the full paper here. Molecular Cancer is an open access journal, so a subscription is not required to read the paper. It’s also an online-only journal that publishes…

I think I can finally call myself a legitimate scientist (whatever that means), since last week one of the papers I worked on during my undergrad at Texas A&M University was published in The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB). I’m the fourth author on the paper, meaning that I was only peripherally involved (and made…

This announcement is a couple of days late, so please accept my apologies, although I can blame it in part on a lack of internet access. Anyways, as of 15:30 GMT last Thursday (August 17th), after enduring what was surely the longest transfer viva in the history of man (two and a half hours–hell, they…

On the weekend of July 28th-30th, about 150 NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) scientists from the UK and Europe (and a few from the US) gathered in Ambleside for the Sixth Annual Collaborative Computing Project for NMR (CCPN) Meeting. The topic of the meeting was “Efficient and Rapid Structure Determination by NMR”, and it included presentations…

Stem Cell Drama

As the Senate votes today on HR 810, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act, this post from the archives describes how the ban on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research has negatively impacted some researchers. In light of these facts, it’s hard to not support the passage of HR 810. (25 January 2006) Embryonic…

This week, Seed asks its ScienceBloggers: How is it that all the PIs (Tara, PZ, Orac et al.), various grad students, post-docs, etc. find time to fulfill their primary objectives (day jobs) and blog so prolifically?… As you probably know, I find myself in the grad student demographic, and as such I have a very…