United Kingdom

The Scientific Activist

Category archives for United Kingdom

Pro-Test March this Saturday

Pro-Test, Oxford’s pro-animal research organization, will be holding its third major public demonstration this Saturday, 9 February: 09.02.08: Pro-test marching on two year anniversary On Saturday 9th February 2008 Pro-Test will march for a third time in support of animal research. We march to: Defend – the rights of researchers to work in peace Celebrate…

The Democratic Party is doing the very cool thing this year of giving Americans living abroad their own delegation to the 2008 Democratic Convention. This means that anyone currently living outside of the US can vote in the Democratic Presidential Primary for their own 11 delegates. Voting will take place online from February 5-12 and…

Robert May on the State of UK Science

Recently I came across a Nature commentary article (subscription required) by Robert May, former president of the Royal Society. Published in June of this year, May’s article commented on the state of UK science as the government transitioned from the leadership of Tony Blair to Gordon Brown. As I read it I couldn’t help but…

Or, at least that’s what I thought when I read this article from Saturday’s Guardian: Universities and medical schools have been criticised for increasing the number of animals used in research by more than 50% since 1996 while industry has reduced its procedures by 20% over the same period. Campaigners say that a cultural inertia…

A couple of current American Rhodes Scholars ruffled a few feathers today after writing an unabashedly critical account of their Oxford experiences for their undergraduate alma mater’s paper, The Harvard Crimson. Melissa Dell and Swati Mylavarapu write: Take it from two veterans, the glitter and prestige of big name scholarships may be less appealing under…

The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) is a matter of British pride, despite some minor shortcomings. Strong on preventative and routine medical care, the NHS has on the other hand been criticized for its long waiting lists required for more involved procedures. The BBC reports today, though, that the NHS is making progress in this…

On the Front Lines with BT

Lines were drawn in the sand, artillery stood armed and ready, and tensions ran high. Neither side was willing to budge, and despite the seemingly endless conflict having already tested the resolve of both sides, it looked like things were only just beginning to get rough. The whole scenario was regrettable–war always is–but it felt…

It has been known officially since 2002 that the sciences are hard, and, as much as we scientists love it when our friends and family tell us how smart and wonderful we must be since they could never understand what we do… is this elevated position going to cost us in the end? Big time?…

Universal Health Care, Duh!

From the archives: (21 January 2006) I had a great trip to the doctor the other day. I showed up for my appointment (one I had made only one day before), waited a few minutes, saw the doctor, and then I left. There was no paperwork, no long wait, no money exchanged, and no stress.…

Pro-Test in Pictures and Sound

I’ve been following Oxford’s pro-research organization Pro-Test since its inception, and a few weeks ago I wrote a post describing its second large march through the streets of Oxford. Pro-Test has received quite a bit of well-deserved press in general, but I was recently directed to another very comprehensive account of the latest march. On…