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Archives for April, 2006

An interesting piece posted on Slate.com yesterday called attention to the results of a NIMH study that might help rank existing antidepressant medications in order of effectiveness. The study, which goes by the awkward moniker of STAR*D (Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression), focused “on the common clinical question of what to do next when…

The Truth About Bunker Busters?

There’s been a lot of talk recently about the Seymour Hersh article in the New Yorker discussing the White House’ plans for stopping Iran’s nuclear program, which claims: One of the military’s initial option plans, as presented to the White House by the Pentagon this winter, calls for the use of a bunker-buster tactical nuclear…

Off the Grid

There’s an interesting article in the New York Times today about the rise of solar power. Apparently the market for solar is growing rapidly–expected to expand by as much as 150 percent between now and the end of 2008. And the new generation of solar panels is 50 percent more efficient at converting sunlight to…

Seed Boston Dinner: Photo Album

On Tuesday, April 4, Boston-area Seed friends and contributors gathered for dinner and conversation at Cambridge’s Oleana restaurant. Seed founder and editor-in-chief Adam Bly hosted the event. Steven Pinker, Seth Lloyd, Irene Pepperberg, Jonah Lehrer, Karl Iagnemma, and Alex Palazzo were some of the guests in attendance at dinner, an event designed to connect friends…

phylotaxis.com Nominated for a Webby!

Seed‘s daily science news aggregator, phylotaxis.com, has been nominated for a Webby Award in the category of ‘Best Navigation/Structure.’ Designed for Seed by artist Jonathan Harris, phylotaxis is based on the mathematical elegance of the Fibonacci Sequence, and the ordered growth of leaves on a plant stem. The appearance of the phylotaxis represents the integration…

The Big Quench

I like Chad Orzel’s True Lab StoriesTM series so much that I’ve decided to be inspired by (read: steal from) him and tell the only vaguely worthy story from my short researching experience. Not too long ago, I was but a wee undergrad doing her senior research in physics. The project had started with vast…

Gather ’round, dear readers, and let me regale you with the sad saga of the late, great Linus Pauling. On second thought, calling it “sad” might be a bit excessive. Pauling was the only person to win two individual Nobels, after all (one for chemistry, one for peace). His great achievements are too numerous to…

Polish science-fiction author Stanislaw Lem, author of The Cyberiad, Solaris and His Master’s Voice, died on March 27. His ashes have been buried in the Salwatorski Cemetery in Krakow. Link to a short article on Candada.com, here. Born in 1921 in Poland, Lem began training as a medical student in Krakow in 1946. Afterwards, he…

Best Science Books Redux

Earlier this week I asked about the best science books of all time. Today, a related question crossed my mind: what novels do scientists like to read…and why? A couple of years ago, I took a grad-school English class devoted to postmodern fiction. Six weeks of the thirteen-week semester were devoted to Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s…

The Ego and the ID

Hey there, budding Stochastic fans. If you’re reading us now, you can officially say you listened to us when we were underground. I’m new to this whole blogging-and-being-read thing, so please be kind while I stand in the shadows of giants. A couple of months ago the Blogosphere was abuzz with news of Kurt Vonnegut…