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Archives for May, 2006

This week, ScienceBloggers tackled the question of how much control the public ought to have over the scientific research that its tax dollars pay for. The question was phrased like so: “Since they’re funded by taxpayer dollars (through the NIH, NSF, and so on), should scientists have to justify their research agendas to the public,…

This week, the ScienceBloggers lined up to take a crack at this fine question: “If you could shake the public and make them understand one scientific idea, what would it be?” Below the fold, in their own words, twelve ScienceBloggers name the ideas they’d be happier if we all grasped firmly. But first, an above-the-fold…

Saving Coral

In the April-May issue of Seed, Josh Braun wrote that the Center for Biological Diversity was moving to get two species of coral & the polar bear listed under the Endangered Species Act. The NY Times article on the news makes no mention that the strategy behind this was to get the US to do…

For this week, ScienceBlogs editorial asked its cabal of bloggers to answer, if the spirit moved them, the following question: Will the ‘human’ race be around in 100 years? More consensus this week than last — but that is the nature of a yes/no question. Luckily, there was some fine exposition along the way. The…

Test Tube Future

My introduction to bioethics came with the issue of in vitro fertilization. I was a student at UC Santa Barbara, designing my own major in science journalism, talking with scientists, reading every science-related news item I could find, and just beginning to gain a conceptual grasp of where the cutting edge was in different fields…

Google Trends: Come ON

Steve Petermann of ID blog Telic Thoughts just posted (warning, link to ID blog) on Google Trends. He says:

ScienceBlogs’ Very First Podcast

Drumroll, please. ScienceBlogs can now be enjoyed on the go, in podcast form. In our first podcast, Sb editors talk with Janet Stemwedel of ‘Adventures in Ethics and Science,’ who presents her views on plagiarism in the sciences: why it matters, who it hurts, and what, just maybe, can be done about it. The program…

Last week, we at the Seed mother-ship taxed the collective brain-power of the ScienceBloggers with the following question: If you could cause one invention from the last hundred years never to have been made at all, which would it be, and why? Their responses have swooped from the sublime to the ridiculous…and back again. ScienceBloggers’…

Organic foods from your supermarket may comply with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program, but are you really buying what you think you’re buying? Many people “go organic” because they want to buy family-farmed, locally-operated produce. But as Steven Shapin points out in the New Yorker, most organic food sold…

Hay Fever Cured With Hookworms

Thanks, Tim, for the link to this story in Kuro5hin, by an individual who claims to have cured himself of hay fever and asthma by deliberately infesting himself with hookworms. This first-hand story, as its author notes, “isn’t for the faint hearted and for some should not be read while eating.” But I recommend putting…