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The Periodic Table of the ScienceBlogs rolls on, with a brief description of every blog in the system. Use it to find your new favorite.

A Blog Around the Clock
Categories: Brain & Behavior, Biology

Bora Zivkovic, better known online as ‘Coturnix,’ created A Blog Around the Clock as a fusion of his three old blogs: Science and Politics, Circadiana, and The Magic School Bus. Bora was born in the former Yugoslavia, where he trained horses, got his black belt in karate, and studied veterinary medicine. In 1991, he emigrated to the USA, settling in North Carolina and earning an MS degree in the Department of Zoology at North Carolina State (studying circadian timing in Japanese quail (coturnix japonica), hence the online handle). He is heavily procrastinating finishing his PhD thesis on the same topic. In A Blog Around the Clock, Bora writes about many aspects of chronobiology, and the biology and medicine of sleep, ranging from textbook-like introductory posts, to critiques of the newest research. He also writes about anything that strikes his wide-ranging fancy.

Adventures in Ethics and Science
Categories: Philosophy of Science, Academia

After double-majoring in chemistry and philosophy at Wellesley College, Janet Stemwedel decided that pursuing chemistry as a profession and philosophy in her spare time would be less likely to result in explosions in her garage than the reverse. So she earned a PhD in physical chemistry at Stanford University. And then, realizing while finishing her thesis that the questions that kept her up at night really had to do with the philosophy of science, she completed a second PhD in philosophy of science, also at Stanford. Since 2002, Janet has been an assistant professor of philosophy at San Jose State University. She blogs about questions of what scientists’ responsibilities are towards other scientists, and how scientists and non-scientists might come to understand and respect each others’ interests. She lives near the San Francisco Bay with her better half, and two offspring. She tries to sleep every few days, whether she needs it or not.

Aetiology
Categories: Biology, Medicine

Tara C. Smith is an assistant professor of epidemiology living in Iowa. Born and raised in Findlay, Ohio, Tara received her BS in Biology from Yale in 1998, then went on to complete a PhD in microbial pathogenesis at the Medical University of Ohio in Toledo, and a postdoc in molecular epidemiology at the University of Michigan. She founded Iowa Citizens for Science and also writes for The Panda’s Thumb. On Aetiology, she discusses microbiology–especially the epidemiology of infectious diseases–as well as vaccines, medicine, public health, pseudoscience, science literacy, and politics.

Afarensis
Categories: Planet Earth

Afarensis has been blogging since 2003, the year in which he stumbled across Pharyngula and decided that PZ made blogging look easy–which Afarensis has since decided it’s not. Educated in anthropology at the University of Tennessee, and now holding a job in corporate America, Afarensis blogs to stay current in physical anthropology, and as his contribution towards rectifying the shortage of scientific knowledge among the public. Consequently, many of his posts lean towards explanation rather than cutting-edge research. Besides anthropology, the blog covers evolution, politics, and rotating topics of interest. Afarensis lives in St Louis with his wife and daughters, where he sails, collects slide rules, and enjoys a good black-and-white horror movie.

Chaotic Utopia
Categories: Philosophy of Science, Planet Earth

Karmen Franklin is a student seeking a double major in philosophy and evolutionary biology. She lives in Colorado with her husband and son. Chaotic Utopia covers chaos and complexity theory, philosophy, adaptive systems (like evolution, climate, and anthropology), and also gives vent to some of Karmen’s other interests, which include poetry, stories, rockhounding, and water gardening. The blog’s name refers to the idea that all we see (as in ‘life, the universe, and everything’) is an ever-changing complex system–a Chaotic Utopia. The blog examines the connections between parts of the system, and the significance of uncertainty at various stages.

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