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Archives for February, 2007

Bee Very Worried…

The Western honeybee, Apis mellifera, came to North America with European settlers in 1622. An invasive species in the 17th century, the honeybee has since become indispensable for its services as a pollinator. Carrying pollen from flower to flower on their bodies, honeybees complete the plant reproductive cycle, vital for the creation of fruit. Farmers…

Have you ever blown it on a standardized test? Had your mind go blank during a job interview? Faced a situation of enormous urgency and…totally underwhelmed yourself? If you’ve ever been puzzled by your inability to do under pressure tasks that you usually find a snap, you can now soothe yourself with the thought that…

Introducing ScienceBlogs Select

Love ScienceBlogs, but find the combined RSS feed overwhelming? Been wanting a way to siphon the cream of ScienceBlogs off the top? Want no more. This week, we introduce ScienceBlogs Select, a new, filtered RSS feed made up of ScienceBloggers’ own favorite posts. The Select feed contains fewer posts than the full feed, and they’ve…

Geek Love

Nerds have seldom been held up as paragons of romantic prowess, and that’s generally gone double for those of the female persuasion. But an essay in the Boston Globe by historian of the family Stephanie Coontz uses demographic evidence to punch a few holes into the popular idea that over-educated women have a hard time…

Diesel is “Global Warming Ready”

Global climate change may melt glaciers, slash biodiversity, and displace countless coastal dwellers, but there’s one thing rising temperatures will never boil away: Our sense of style! That’s the message Diesel (the jeans company, not the fuel) hopes to spread with its newest advertising campaign, “Global Warming Ready.” When the Earth—and, apparently, all of its…

Couples who find the pill problematic and condoms cumbersome may be interested in a study out today in the journal Human Reproduction. The report, lead authored by Petra Frank-Hermann, a professor in the Department of Gynecological Endocrinology at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, followed 900 women who practice a form of natural family planning…

Seed and Threadless, Sitting In a Tree

Sharpen your pencils (or your favorite graphic design app) and strap your thinking cap on. Seed has paired with Threadless to bring you a contest you won’t want to miss. Design a tee shirt around the theme of “science is culture.” Submit your design by midnight on March 19 for your chance to win an…

Sagan the Skeptic

Hot off the presses: Skeptical Inquirer magazine has a new rememberance of Carl Sagan by David Morrison, which highlights Sagan’s sometimes-forgotten role as a skeptic. From the article: Throughout his career, Sagan devoted himself to the quest to improve public understanding of the nature of science. He wanted every citizen to have a “baloney detector”…

We’ve Had it Up to Here.

A recent report by the Asian Development Bank predicts that garbage output by Asian cities will more than double by 2025–from 760 thousand tons to 1.8 million tons per day. That amount of garbage would rapidly swamp the municipal governments charged with taking care of trash disposal. Here in the U.S., New York and Maryland…

The Trouble With Teacher’s Pet

Nobody likes being told they’re dumb. But being praised up and down for one’s intelligence carries its own price, according to research by Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck and her research team. In the current issue of New York Magazine, writer Po Bronson summarizes Dweck’s work, which indicates that children who are frequently told that they…