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Archives for June, 2009

Annually focusing on a different discipline, the Nobel Laureates meet in Lindau (Southern Germany). This year’s meeting is going to be about chemistry and we, the editors of ScienceBlogs.de will be covering all events along with seven blogging scientists. Although there will of course be lots of articles in German, we also launched an English…

The Buzz: Science in the Cinema

As scientists often lament, science in the entertainment industry is often ignored or misportrayed outside the realm of science fiction. But two compelling new documentaries have ScienceBloggers hopeful that their messages will have the mass-market appeal of films such as An Inconvenient Truth or Fast Food Nation. The End of the Line, which Darren Naish…

Last weekend, some ultra-powerful movers, shakers, and carvers of our planet caught ScienceBloggers’ attentions. First, researchers debated the potential for Mt. Saint Helens to form a supervolcano, an extraordinarily large volcano with the potential to cause massive wildlife destruction and devastating impacts on climate. Bloggers also discussed two megafloods: one that permanently separated Great Britain…

The Buzz: Fishing For the Truth

The observation of World Oceans Day June 8 sparked a lively online debate about the environmental repercussions of seafood consumption. Is it possible to know whether the fish you are eating is truly sustainable? Why is Pacific cod “safe” but Atlantic cod off limits? Is farm-raised salmon really better than wild? Jennifer Jacquet of Guilty…

Earlier this year, 23 international experts in science, media, and policy gathered at a science communication workshop in Washington, D.C. to present a number of guidelines for more effective science communication in the face of changing public perceptions. An article describing the eight steps they outlined appeared last week in the June issue of Nature…

The two major policy approaches to cutting carbon emissions, cap-and-trade and carbon taxes, both work by putting a price on pollution. Carbon tax—simply, a tax on fossil fuels—is intended to motivate businesses to conserve energy and switch to cleaner energy sources in order to save money. Cap-and-trade schemes put a limit on how much pollution…

This weekend, with spring in the air, ScienceBloggers left their computers and stepped into the wild outdoors. However, as evidenced by the blog entries they scurried to post shortly thereafter, these are not individuals who take a lazy day off from science. From photographing an unidentified turtle to an alluringly blue pansy, these scientists are…

All scientific laboratories are not created equal, a fact evident in the differences in regulations and expectations between large research centers and smaller-scale labs. As Mike the Mad Biologist explains, large genomics labs in particular are subject to productivity standards, such as the swift publicization of genomic sequence data, that smaller labs are not forced…

In January, Barack Obama promised in his inaugural address to “restore science to its rightful place.” The pledge was a win for scientists everywhere, and particularly for those working in the US. But now, with the European Parliamentary (EP) elections at hand, whether Obama’s sentiments are shared by politicians worldwide remains to be seen. Last…

Early detection can prevent almost 100 percent of colorectal cancer cases. Combating the disease is a question of social innovations that convince people of regular testing. The Felix Burda Foundation, founded in 2001 by Dr. Christa Maar and Dr. Hubert Burda, with the quest to decrease the mortality rate of colon cancer in Germany, recently…