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Archives for July, 2009

In 2007, the Arctic saw its lowest levels of sea ice coverage than any year in recorded history, and trends for 2009 indicate that we may be on our way to a new record low. The low summer coverage follows a winter that saw an unprecedented disappearance of thick, multiyear ice, which is more resistant…

Dendritic Input Make It Hot

Dope A. Mean and the Glut-Tang Clan may not be a household name yet, but if the debut video of their smash hit Synaptic Cleft is any indication, they’re poised to be the breakout group of the summer. S to the YNAPSE!

As President Obama continues to garner support for his healthcare reform plan, ScienceBloggers are also taking a look at the issues in play. Peter Lipson of White Coat Underground investigates the perception that centralized, salary-based medicine is more efficient than a system based on private practice. Revere of Effect Measure discusses the dangerous tendency to…

New Hot Spot on Jupiter

Around midnight on July 19, an Australian astronomer named Anthony Wesley noticed something new while looking through his telescope at Jupiter: a black spot in the planet’s south polar region, similar to one that appeared in 1994 after it was struck by the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet. Wesley rushed to share his observation with other astronomers,…

Since 2003, the Atheist Alliance International has annually presented the Richard Dawkins Award to “an outstanding atheist whose contributions raise public awareness of the nontheist life stance.” Past recipients of the prize have included James Randi, magicians Penn Jillette and Raymond Teller, and comedian Julia Sweeney. When it was recently revealed that the 2009 Richard…

“One of the difficulties with trying to broaden the usual definition of scientists is that there’s not a lot of press for non-academic science,” Chad Orzel wrote recently on Uncertain Principles. So he decided to give it some exposure himself. Chad’s call for scientists with non-academic careers returned a wealth of responses, from the Chief…

The Buzz: 40 Years After Apollo

Four decades ago, Neil Armstrong became the first person to step foot on the Moon. His “one giant leap for mankind” is one of the most recognizable achievements in the history of American science. The success of the Apollo 11 mission represented not only the possibilities of space exploration, but of the entire field of…

If you’ve been running into time-outs and submission errors while commenting lately, you’re not alone—our system has been suffering some growing pains and it’s time for a network-wide rehaul of sorts. Tonight we’ll be transferring over to shiny new servers, and we hope that this will make things run more smoothly for everyone. To make…

The Moon and a Star

Moon walk. Moonwalk It’s been a good 40 years.

The Buzz: Battle of the Winged

Like the Marvel Comics villain Mysterio who blocks Spiderman’s spider-sense by emitting a special gas, a species of tiger moths can jam the sonar signals emitted by bats in order to escape the grisly fate of becoming a midflight meal. The tiger moths, Bertholdia trigona, possess a unique structure, the tymbal, that produces a clicking…