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Archives for August, 2009

As the long days of late summer grow shorter and darker, many of us are trying to eke out as much time outdoors as possible before fall’s sweaters and yellowing leaves arrive. ScienceBloggers are no exception this week as they took to the natural world, focusing the lens of science on wildlife. Greg Laden’s Blog…

The current health care debate has centered largely on the elderly, but as ScienceBloggers are pointing out, young adults have equally as much at stake in the outcome of health care reform. On Thus Spake Zuska, Zuska recounts the struggles of two different young women–one a victim of the Pittsburgh L.A. Fitness shooting earlier this…

For the first time in over a century, New York’s Salmon River is home to its namesake species of fish. Young Atlantic salmon were abundant in the Salmon River and nearby Lake Ontario in the 19th century but were driven away by damming, pollution and overfishing—now, USGS scientists have reported that efforts to reestablish the…

Though reported Swine Flu cases have dwindled over the summer months, the Centers for Disease Control warns that a full-blown pandemic is on the horizon as fall inaugurates the 2009-2010 Flu Season, mirroring the progression of the 1918 Spanish Influenza. Now, with the advent of vaccines and medical technologies, as well as improved personal and…

The Buzz: Summer Reading

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many ScienceBloggers are trying to squeeze in some final summer reading before they–and their sprogs–embark on the new academic year. On Confessions of a Science Librarian, John Dupuis asks for his readers’ assistance in selecting titles and offers a few recommendations of his own. Janet Stemwedel of Adventures…

The Buzz: Hitting the Human Wall

Human athletic performance has the consistent ability to amaze us–we tend to think of the Michael Phelpses and Lance Armstrongs of the world as nearly superhuman. But in fact, there are physiological limits to our species’ strength and speed. On Starts With a Bang, Ethan Siegel calculates the fastest time theoretically possible for the mens’…

The Buzz: No Comment

In peer reviewed research, scientific insight is often gained as much from the comments on a published journal article as it is from the paper itself. Comments address mistakes overlooked during peer review and offer scientists with opposing views a chance to critique their competitors’ work. But what if the journal refuses to publish a…

The Buzz: Zombie Epidemiology

In the event of a zombie epidemic, scientists have settled on an unambiguous plan for survival: be aggressive. Mathematicians from the University of Ottawa and Carleton University modelled the outcome of responses to zombie infection including quarantine, development of a cure, and “regular, impulsive” slaying of undead to reduce their numbers. The results of their…

Our worst fears confirmed

As reported in The New York Post, British botanists recently discovered a species of pitcher plant that consumes entire rats—not insects, rats. The plant was found atop Mount Victoria in the Philippines and has been named Nepenthes attenboroughii after Sir David Attenborough. Hapless rodents, like the one below, that stumble into its open mouth are…

Announcing ScienceOnline2010

At the annual ScienceOnline conference, organized in large part by ScienceBlogger Bora Zivkovic of A Blog Around the Clock, scientists gather to talk about the changing role of the Internet in the practice and communication of science. At the 2009 event in January, panel discussions included “Social networking for scientists,” “Alternative careers: how to become…