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Archives for October, 2009

The Full Spectrum of Science

Photo by Ted Kinsman, as seen on Photo Synthesis. Far from being a world of sterile white labs and colorless data, science offers some of the most spectacular imagery imaginable. Take the microscopic guppy embryo, a finalist in Nikon’s 2009 Small World contest, which Frank Swain shares on SciencePunk. Or the punch-colored demonstration of Newton’s…

In the use of immunopharmacotherapy to treat drug abuse, antigenic molecules are hitched to molecules of the drug to stimulate a future immune response against the drug itself; as DrugMonkey reported this week, a recently published paper offers hopeful evidence that it could be a potentially effective treatment against cocaine addiction, though he cautioned, “It…

Modern Fear, Modern Security

What moves human beings to innovate measures of security? History will tell us that the most inventive and industrious times are fraught with warfare, uncertainty, and widespread fear. Greg Laden, a longtime ScienceBlogger, helps tackle this topic this month on the new Collective Imagination blog with Peter Tu, a systems design engineer who has developed…

The Buzz: Nobel Prizes 2009

Announcement of the 2009 Nobel Prize winners began Monday morning with the prize in Physiology or Medicine. The prize was shared between two American and one Australian-American researchers who identified a vital mechanism in genetic operations of cells–Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider, and Jack Szostak. The trio was honored for their discovery of the protective relationship…

This week kicked off the 2009 Donors Choose Social Media Challenge–a program ScienceBloggers take part in annually to help public school teachers build scientific literacy, engagement, and excitement among their students. DonorsChoose.org is an online charity where public school teachers from across the country submit requests for specific needs or special projects in their classrooms,…

The Buzz: Science in Sex

There’s no denying that sex is important for most creatures biologically. For humans, the biological imperative of sex has seeped into our psyches over thousands of years worth of evolution, making it more essential than we realize. On The Frontal Cortex, Jonah Lehrer reports on a new column in Mind Matters positing that love and…

The Buzz: In a Perfect Lab…

This week, ScienceBloggers are full of ideas to better the practice of research science. In Scicurious’s perfect lab, negative data–data that doesn’t support a study’s hypothesis–would be every bit as publishable as data that confirms it. In Janet Stemwedel’s perfect lab, animal researchers would engage in dialogue over debate in the face of violent opposition.…