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Archives for April, 2010

Generally, it takes the threat of imminent death or disaster to get earth science onto the front page of newspapers, and today is no exception. A massive plume of ash emanating from the tongue-twisting Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland has thrown a wrench into much of Europe’s travel plans; the silicate particles in the ash can…

At last summer’s Summit of the Americas, President Obama announced the formation of a multinational organization aimed at increasing renewable energy usage, confronting climate change, and promoting tech transfer and sustainability practices amongst its members.

Williams Syndrome and Racial Bias

Yesterday’s edition of the journal Current Biology featured an interesting study on Williams Syndrome, a genetic condition marked by cognitive deficits but also a several common personality traits. People with Williams are excessively outgoing and friendly, are often musically talented, and, most importantly to this study, show no social fear. Researchers at the University of…

Yesterday, we welcomed Jason Goldman of The Thoughtful Animal to ScienceBlogs. And if you liked his post about desert ants on stilts, you’re going to love the blogger who has joined us today: Alex Wild of Myrmecos. Like Goldman, Wild’s no stranger to SB or the science blogosphere; his awesome insect photography was featured on…

Introducing The Thoughtful Animal

Start your week off by welcoming the newest member of the to the ScienceBlogs family: Jason Goldman of The Thoughtful Animal. Jason is a doctoral student studying cognition and behavior at the University of Southern California. You may already be familiar with Jason’s blog, his Pi Day Contest pie, or his involvement in Research Blogging,…

Every other year, the National Science Board publishes its Science and Engineering Indicators report: data points from various aspects of academia, industry, and public life that aspire to gauge the nation’s scientific strengths and weaknesses. One of the more interesting indicators is a survey given to adults and students about basic scientific questions, i.e. does…

Announcing Australopithecus Sediba

If you’re reading a science story today, chances are you’re going to see the name Australopithecus sediba in it. That’s the designation of the hominid fossil discovered in South Africa in 2008, which is making its debut in tomorrow’s edition of Science. And now that the embargo has been lifted, you’re also likely to see…

A Fresh Haul of Sea Life Posts

World Water Day may have come and gone, but ScienceBloggers re still searching the depths of the oceans and the rivers of tropical islands for great new research. Today, Nick Anthis of The Scientific Activist points to the discovery of the first truly anaerobic animal. These microscopic creatures don’t need oxygen to make their home…

The Open Laboratory Begins Anew

Since 2006, Bora Zivkovic of A Blog Around the Clock has been in charge The Open Laboratory, a series of collections of — as the subtitle says – the best science writing on blogs. The “open” in this case is not only about exposing the inner workings of science, but the democratic and transparent process…