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Emily Anthes

Neurogenesis at Neuroscience 2007

The conference has been astounding, but today, day four, I’m officially getting brain fatigue. (Notice how these posts are getting shorter?) Nevertheless, researchers continue to present fascinating work. Today’s noteworthy event was a session on neurogenesis. A number of researchers presented interesting twists on the phenomenon, including: Intermittent fasting significantly increases neurogenesis in mice—even more…

Today’s festivities featured a great talk on neuroethics. Actually, it was one of the first truly good talks I’ve heard about neuroethics. The speaker was Martha Farah, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. She skipped the dreadful sci-fi speculation that peppers so many talks on neuroethics and stuck to the facts,…

Neuropalooza, day two. Some fascinating presentations this afternoon on corollary discharge. Corollary discharge is the brain’s mechanism for distinguishing between self-generated and external stimuli. It helps the brain disregard sensations that are generated by our bodies own movements. For instance, when we view a painting, our eyes are constantly moving across it. Yet, the painting…

Live from Neuroscience 2007…

Today, 30,000 scientists descended upon San Diego for Neuroscience 2007, the Society for Neuroscience’s annual scientific meeting. With more than 16,000 presentations over just five days, the conference is more than any one reporter could possibly cover. But I’m going to do my best, posting daily wrap-ups here and highlighting some of the most interesting,…

Marching Toward Doomsday

This Wednesday, the world will officially creep closer to nuclear apocalypse, according to the Doomsday Clock maintained by the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. The symbolic Doomsday Clock counts down the minutes to midnight, which represents the moment of global disaster. The Clock is currently set at seven minutes to midnight and will, presumably, move forward…

You Can Always Read This Later

Piers Steel, a professor at the University of Calgary’s school of business, knows why you procrastinate. And he’s got the formula to prove it. Steel has just published his mathematical model for procrastination, and it looks a little something like this: Utility = E x V / Γ D Where utility is the desirability of…