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Erin Johnson

If your loved ones are at a loss this holiday season as to what shiny objects might most set your cardiac muscle aflutter, quick! You’re running out of time. But you are not alone! It’s tougher to shop for science nerds than might be imagined. After all, a Sagan lover is not a Kevin J.…

Dear Readers, It is our great pleasure to bring you news of an exciting new partnership, starting today, between ScienceBlogs and National Geographic. ScienceBlogs and National Geographic have at their cores the same ultimate mission: to cultivate widespread interest in science and the natural world. Starting today, we will work together to advance this common…

In the increasingly competitive and admissions-driven world of high school, learning doesn’t always come cheap. SAT-prep programs and college admissions counselors charge a pretty penny for the advantages they (claim to) bestow upon anxious juniors and seniors, and even younger students, including those in middle school, are feeling the pressure. But what about families who…

This week, Jessica Palmer of Bioephemera posted an illuminating report on the politics that govern—and often hamper—scientific research for drug abuse treatment. In her post, Jessica points out, “research to help [cigarette] smokers quit is generally portrayed as necessary and important,” but the media, politicians, and society at large view research for treatment of other…

The Buzz: Social Media Revolution

In the past five years, technology has played a major part in influencing the way we functions, even in the least mechanical of human behaviors–like socializing. Today, ScienceBloggers are taking a close look at how the social media explosion is affecting the world. On The Primate Diaries, Eric Michael Johnson reports on anthropologist Stefana Broadbent’s…

Last week, Dan Delong, an English teacher at Southwestern High School in Piasa, Illinois was suspended for allowing students to read an article on homosexuality in the animal kingdom. The article in question, “The Gay Animal Kingdom,” was written by ScienceBlogger Jonah Lehrer of The Frontal Cortex, and published by Seed magazine in 2006. Mr.…

Second Skin

What if your clothes grew themselves in response to your body’s temperature, becoming thicker in areas that needed more insulation and thinner in areas that were warm enough? Sounds pretty much ideal. No worrying about whether you’re going to need a scarf later in the evening or if a down parka was maybe not the…

In honor of Halloween this weekend, we scared up some classic spooky ScienceBlogs posts. Brian Switek of Laelaps discusses ghosts, UFOs, psychics, witchcraft and other “paranormal rot” many people use to explain “rather ordinary phenomena.” On SciencePunk, Frank Swain contemplates the mathematical improbability of vampires due to sure vampire population explosion. However, Frank also points…

Looking Inside the Brain

Photo Credit: Herederos de Santiago Ramón y Cajal Recently, ScienceBlogger Mo Costandi of Neurophilosophy penned a photo essay for MIT’s Technology Review magazine, taking readers on a visual tour of the history of brain imaging, from the first Purkinje cells viewed through a light microscope to fluorescently tagged neurons in “Brainbow” mice showing the connections…

In honor of Halloween this week, ScienceBloggers are offering some creepy crawlies to intrigue and frighten you. Ed Yong of Not Exactly Rocket Science began spinning the spider web with his fascinating coverage of the Bagheera kiplingi, a “mostly vegetarian” jumping spider found throughout Latin America. Days later, he reported on the recently discovered Nephila…