Archaeology

Page 3.14

Category archives for Archaeology

New Avenues to Knowledge

Science publishing is at a crossroads. On We Beasties, Kevin Bonham says that early scientists “communicated amongst themselves in person or in letters or in books. They shared discoveries freely and it was possible for an individual human to be aware of almost the entire sum of human knowledge.” As the pace of discovery accelerated,…

Inspiring One Another

We inspire each other with our everyday actions and attitudes–monkey see, monkey do. On The Frontal Cortex, Jonah Lehrer describes an experiment in which individuals who observed their peers choosing carrots over cookies were more likely to make the same thoughtful choice themselves. Jonah explains that self-control “contains a large social component” and plays a…

After an expedition through the Sarahan sands of Morocco, ScienceBlogger Darren Naish from Tetrapod Zoology has returned to share astonishing essays and photo documentation of his journey. “Our primary aim was to discover Cretaceous dinosaurs, pterosaurs and other fossil reptiles,” Naish wrote in Part 1 of his four-part blogumentary, but he also encountered exotic living…

The Buzz: Body of Copernicus Found

Last week, scientists positively identified the bones of Nicolaus Copernicus, the astronomer credited with scientifically formulating the idea that the universe is heliocentric and prompting the 16th century scientific revolution. To be sure that the bones were actually those of Copernicus, the scientists compared DNA from the unmarked remains found in a grave beneath Frombork…

Page 3.14 interviews are back! Somehow it’s taken many moons for veteran SciBling Martin Rundkvist, of Aardvarchaeology, to answer our barrage of questions. The Swedish archaeologist (pictured at right with his daughter) made headlines recently when he discovered, while metal-detecting on the island of Djurö, a 92-centimeter, 16th-century sword. Much more below the fold…

Prehistoric Dental Hygiene

Our Neanderthal ancestors probably cleaned their teeth, Spanish newspaper El Pais reported recently.

Say hello to Google Ancient Earth? Today’s high-resolution satellites are now snapping photos of millennia-old archaeological sites, and may be the key to their preservation. Every year, tourists flock to Egypt to see the Great Pyramids and the Temple of Luxor. But experts estimate that more than 99 percent of the region’s archaeological sites are…