Astronomy

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Category archives for Astronomy

New Hot Spot on Jupiter

Around midnight on July 19, an Australian astronomer named Anthony Wesley noticed something new while looking through his telescope at Jupiter: a black spot in the planet’s south polar region, similar to one that appeared in 1994 after it was struck by the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet. Wesley rushed to share his observation with other astronomers,…

The Buzz: 40 Years After Apollo

Four decades ago, Neil Armstrong became the first person to step foot on the Moon. His “one giant leap for mankind” is one of the most recognizable achievements in the history of American science. The success of the Apollo 11 mission represented not only the possibilities of space exploration, but of the entire field of…

The Moon and a Star

Moon walk. Moonwalk It’s been a good 40 years.

Swiss astronomers recently discovered the small exoplanet, Gliese 581 e, calculated to have a minium mass less than twice that of our own dear planet. This planet resides within the same solar system as Gliese 581 d, which scientists speculate could be capable of supporting life. “With a minimum age of these planets of 7…

The Buzz: Earth Day

Today is Earth Day, and here on ScienceBlogs our bloggers are observing it by sharing their reasons for caring about our planet and its environment. ScienceBlogs’ newest blog, Guilty Planet, launched today in timing with the occasion. Written by Jennifer Jacquet, formerly of Shifting Baselines, the blog will explore human patterns of consumption and what…

In this week’s Science Saturday, blogger and astronomer Phil Plait chats with science journalist Carl Zimmer. They talk about the time Buzz Aldrin punched a moon-landing denialist in the face, how consumer-culture gadgetry can serve the cause of science, the death of newspapers in the Internet age, and the big questions in astronomy that Phil…

Using the Hubble Telescope, scientists have successfully viewed a planet revolving around a different star than our beloved Sun for the first time. The planet has been dubbed Fomalhaut b and revolves around the star Fomalhaut, the brightest star in the constellation Piscis calculated to reside about 25 light years away. ScienceBlogger Steinn Sigurðsson broke…

The ScienceBlogs.de team interviews Nobel Prize winner Riccardo Giacconi (Physics, 2002) at the Nobel Laureate Meetings in Lindau, Germany, held June 29 through July 4th. In it, Giacconi discusses the discovery of a new class of objects, X-ray stars. Onsite Coverage THE 2008 MEETINGS OF NOBEL LAUREATES IN LINDAU Courtesy of scienceblogs.de | More Coverage…

Phoenix Lands!

After a 10-month, 420-million-mile journey, NASA’s Phoenix probe touched down on Mars’ northern Arctic Circle at 4:53 p.m. Pacific Time Sunday, becoming the first to ever successfully reach a polar region of the Red Planet. And boy are the ScienceBloggers excited! For the next three months, Phoenix will dig into the soil to find out…

Our Lucky Stars

A team of astronomers from Cambridge and Caltech recently used a ground-based camera called “Lucky” to take stellar pictures that are much sharper than those taken by the beloved Hubble telescope—and cost 50,000 times less.