Biology

Page 3.14

Category archives for Biology

On Tetrapod Zoology, Darren Naish acquaints us with all manner of vesper bats, a group which comprises 410 of the 1110 bat species worldwide. In Part I, Darren provides an overview of the group as a whole, including their snub-nosed morphology, invertebrate eating habits, echolocation frequencies, and migratory tactics, which may have “evolved at least…

The Science of Kissing

Kissing remains popular among the people of the world, and in a new book former scibling Sheril Kirshenbaum delves into the emerging science behind the age-old practice. For one, the sensory experience of osculation (as sucking face is more formally known) forges new neuronal connections in the brain. On Dean’s Corner, Dr. Jeffrey Toney says…

Celebrating Henrietta Lacks

On February 2, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by ScienceBlogger Rebecca Skloot was officially published. If you haven’t heard, everyone who has read this book has wonderful things to say. Dr. Isis on On Becoming a Domestic and Laboratory Goddess declares it “the single best piece of non-fiction I have ever read. It is…

Barricading the Body

If not always wieldy, armor offers great protection against teeth, talons and pincers–not to mention blades, bullets and shrapnel. On Not Exactly Rocket Science, Ed Yong reports that a deep sea snail has evolved one of the toughest shells on the planet, a three-layer system that has scientists rethinking the possibilities of human armor. These…

Cause and Effect

Evolutionary change responds to all kinds of pressures, and sometimes, the results can be surprising. On Gene Expression, Razib Khan challenges the idea that human evolution has stopped since “the vast majority of humans reach the age of potential reproduction.” He explains that differential mortality is not a precondition for natural selection, and supports his…

Gotta Make ‘Em All!

Charmanders and Squirtles are fascinating creatures–but being fictional, they place pretty low on the relevancy scale. Still, kids of all ages are obsessed with Pokémon, and David Ng on The World’s Fair wants to turn that admiration toward real creatures so that we might better learn and care about the lifeforms on our planet. The…

New Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

On Wednesday, the NIH approved thirteen new embryonic stem cell lines for federally-funded research, with ninety-six additional lines still under review. These new approvals come as a direct result of the “Obama administration’s new rules on federal funding for stem cell research, which reversed the Bush policy of prohibiting such funding in most cases.” Read…

Now, Never, or Next Year

Listen up, procrastinators—Coturnix reminds us on A Blog Around the Clock that we only have until the stroke of midnight to submit the best blog entries of the year to OpenLab 2009. He writes “we are looking for original poems, art, cartoons and comics” as well as essays. You can see which posts have already…

Second Skin

What if your clothes grew themselves in response to your body’s temperature, becoming thicker in areas that needed more insulation and thinner in areas that were warm enough? Sounds pretty much ideal. No worrying about whether you’re going to need a scarf later in the evening or if a down parka was maybe not the…

In honor of Halloween this week, ScienceBloggers are offering some creepy crawlies to intrigue and frighten you. Ed Yong of Not Exactly Rocket Science began spinning the spider web with his fascinating coverage of the Bagheera kiplingi, a “mostly vegetarian” jumping spider found throughout Latin America. Days later, he reported on the recently discovered Nephila…