Biology

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Category archives for Biology

A notorious bacterial foe has made its first documented appearance in the U.S. and is jumping species around the farm scene. First, MSRA—methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus— was found in chickens. Just recently, research conducted by ScienceBlogger Tara Smith from Aetiology found that ST398, a strain found in pigs, was also found in many of the…

What should humanity anticipate from WWIII? To find out, check out the Invitrogen-sponsored ScienceBlog, What’s New in Life Science Research. This week our group of experts and seasoned ScienceBloggers will explore the way biological warfare is developing in our modern world as new technologies emerge—and what we should do to defend ourselves.

The Buzz: Viral Video: Weird Squid

Video footage of a rare “elbowed” squid taken remotely from a Shell Oil Company drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico went viral this weekend. The squid is of the genus Magnapinna, has tentacles over 20 feet long, and is one of only a handful of its kind to have ever been observed by humans.…

Monday night, the British Parliament voted on embryo science laws for the first time in nearly 20 years. After weeks of debate, the House of Commons voted 336 to 176 to reject a proposed ban on the use of human-animal hybrid embryos in scientific research. Human-animal hybrids were first created in 2003, by Chinese scientists…

Last Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) with a vote of 414 to 1. Lauded by most media pundits as an example of “forward-looking” legislation, the bill forbids companies from viewing the genetic profiles of their clients or employees. President Bush has promised to sign the bill. But…

Last Wednesday, Nature released the results of an informal survey about cognitive enhancers—drugs known to improve concentration and counteract fatigue. Twenty percent of the 1,400 international respondents said they had used cognitive enhancers (such as Ritalin and beta blockers) for non-medical reasons to stimulate their focus, concentration or memory. Eighty percent thought that healthy adults…

It’s winter. And here in NYC, that means it’s cold, icy, and generally miserable. Everyone I know is coughing, aching, sneezing, and blowing noses. Ten million sick readers undoubtedly want to know the answer to our latest “Ask A ScienceBlogger” question: What is a Disease? Four scibling responses below the fold…

(This is a guest post written by Mo, the Neurophilosopher.) I’m very pleased to announce that the fantastic Bioephemera has been “acquired” by ScienceBlogs. When I first started reading it, I knew that I had found a unique blog, and it soon became one of my favourites. (More below the fold…)

On TOPP of the World

We tend to think of alien life as that which may habitate other planets. But the vast, uncharted expanse of our own oceans is, in many ways, just as alien. To get a better idea of the ecology and dynamics of ocean life, marine biologists, oceanographers, and engineers for the past few years have been…

I’m Ready For My Close-Up!

If you’re thinking about pollen much and you’re not a farmer or a beekeeper, chances are you probably suffer from wicked seasonal allergies. Then again, you could be an artist. Kysa Johnson, a painter whose work explores microcosmic and macrocosmic natural phenomena, opens a show this weekend at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield,…