Climate

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Category archives for Climate

Burning the Midday Oil

Not one to let physical and economic reality get in the way of a good one-liner, Newt Gingrich recently remarked that the United States could “open up enough oil fields in the next year that the price of oil worldwide would collapse.” But as Sharon Astyk reports on Casaubon’s Book, it can take years to…

Popular Anti-Science

On Class M, James Hrynyshyn reports a counter-intuitive survey conclusion: people who are more educated about science are less likely to be worried about climate change. The study posits that views on climate change are “cultural” and not purely scientific, making people want to “fit in” to a skeptical mainstream. But James writes, “Surely embracing…

Past and Future Forecasts

Meteorology still depends on a bit of clairvoyance, but in the 19th century many sailors, fishermen, and farmers “had to rely on storm glass, an inexpensive and profoundly inaccurate divining tool.” The mixture of “camphor crystals, potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, water and alcohol” transitions from “solid to crystalline under circumstances that still aren’t full understood.”…

Editor Does What’s Right (for Wrong)

On Deltoid, Tim Lambert reports that Wolfgang Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of the journal Remote Sensing, has taken personal responsibility for the publication of a “problematic” paper and resigned his role. Wagner writes, “With this step I would also like to personally protest against how the authors and like-minded climate sceptics have much exaggerated the paper’s conclusions,”…

Mind the Red Herrings

On Stoat, a new paper says that misinformation causes confusion about otherwise settled climate science, and suggests that the “direct study of misinformation” can potentially “sharpen student critical thinking skills, raise awareness of the processes of science such as peer review, and improve understanding of the basic science.” William M. Connolley looks at more papers…

Bjørn Lomborg Switches Sides

Last week, “The Skeptical Environmentalist” Bjørn Lomborg announced that he was skeptical no more. Timed with the release of his new book “Smart Solutions to Climate Change: Comparing Costs and Benefits” Lomborg now says that the world needs an investment of $100 Billion a year to fight global warming. Lomborg denies this is a total…

When James Hrynyshyn launched The Island of Doubt in five years ago, he directed his efforts at dismantling “pseudoskeptical arguments from those who have trouble accepting reality.” This meant covering a variety of subjects, from climate change, to creationism, to alternative medicine, and more. And while this has put The Island of Doubt into august…

Fighting Change with Change

If we are to skirt the disasters of pollution, ocean acidification, and climate change, we must change our ways of life. But as Matthew C. Nisbet reports on Framing Science, young people may be less engaged than older generations when it comes to global warming. Citing survey numbers that show young people trust information from…

Endless Frontiers of Science

Science is knowledge, and knowledge can inspire certainty. But certainty, as much a fruit of science, can be its enemy. Whatever wonders may meet the eye, there has always been more to the world. On Oscillator, Christina Agapakis explores the frontiers of synthetic biology, where researchers hope to manufacture “altered proteins or entirely different biological…

Getting it All Wrong

Even with the best intentions, it’s possible to get things wrong. And with lesser intentions, being wrong becomes easy. First, James Hrynyshyn on The Island of Doubt reports that the IPCC will retract its 2007 prediction that global warming could melt the Himalayan glaciers by 2035. Although the IPCC promises “the best peer-reviewed science available,”…