Culture

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Category archives for Culture

The Buzz: Queens Pwn in Chess

While attempts to explain the disproportionate number of women in math and science have resulted in the conclusion that women are innately inferior to men in these areas, the methodology has often—if not always—been flawed. By analyzing chess players to explain the lack of female grandmasters, one study found the lack is mostly attributable to…

The advent of the science blogger is changing the way people talk about science. But along with new modes of communication and new rhetoric come new questions and opinions about how this evolution is affecting the scientific process. ScienceBlogger Coturnix from A Blog Around the Clock posted his views about why both scientists and science…

When the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden and the Genesis and Creation Museum announced a combined admission offer November 30, protest erupted in the blogosphere. “I believe the Cincinnati Zoo has betrayed its mission and its trust in a disgraceful way by aligning themselves with a creationist institution,” said ScienceBlogger PZ Myers from Pharyngula, urging…

Last week, a bunch of sciblings wrote about a study from Purdue psychologists suggesting that high consumption of artificial sweeteners is linked to obesity. In the study—published in Behavioral Neuroscience in February—rats fed a sugar substitute gained significantly more weight than those fed regular glucose. Not gonna lie: As someone who consumes those sweet yellow…

Are you a homebody?

Last week, the ScienceBloggers wrote about a new study in Nature in which scientists tracked the cellphone habits of 100,000 Europeans and found that people rarely strayed from familiar locations—their homes and workplaces. It made me wonder….Are our readers homebodies, too? Click Here for PollSurveys | Online Polls | Idea ManagementView MicroPoll Want to know…

Despite An Inconvenient Truth‘s Oscar win and Al Gore’s Nobel, public opinion of global warming has changed little since the film’s release in 2006. As Matt Nisbet recently pointed out: “Conventional wisdom pegged Gore’s film and media campaign as changing the nature of the debate in the public’s mind, but unfortunately this interpretation doesn’t hold…

What’s your workbench?

Where do you do science? Seed Magazine wants to know. We’ve all seen the stereotypical pictures of a science lab: microscopes and petri dishes sitting atop sterile work benches; electric circuits sunk in a mess of metal wires and batteries; equations scribbled on blackboards. But we also know that plenty of world-changing science goes on…

Last Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) with a vote of 414 to 1. Lauded by most media pundits as an example of “forward-looking” legislation, the bill forbids companies from viewing the genetic profiles of their clients or employees. President Bush has promised to sign the bill. But…

Last Wednesday, Nature released the results of an informal survey about cognitive enhancers—drugs known to improve concentration and counteract fatigue. Twenty percent of the 1,400 international respondents said they had used cognitive enhancers (such as Ritalin and beta blockers) for non-medical reasons to stimulate their focus, concentration or memory. Eighty percent thought that healthy adults…

Are You in a Book Club?

About six months ago, I started a book club with a bunch of my girl friends. So far, we’ve only read three books. But despite the infrequency of our meetings, the club has been both fun and intellectually fulfilling. Anyway, the whole experience got me thinking about the popularity of book clubs. The Association of…