Geology

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Category archives for Geology

Disaster in Haiti

A 7.0 magnitude earthquake rocked Haiti yesterday, and while the devastation is readily apparent, the human toll is not yet known. Chris Rowan details the tectonics on the event on Highly Allochtonous, explaining that the epicenter’s proximity to Port-au-Prince means the capital “endured the maximum possible shaking intensity from an earthquake of this size.” Rowan…

On the first day of Christmas, one might gift his or her true love with a certain bird in a certain fruit tree…unless one’s true love is geology. On Highly Allocthonous, Chris Rowan runs down a seasonal list of twelve geologic features, forms, and phenomena that interest him more than drummers drumming or lords a-leaping,…

The Buzz: Step On a Crack…

When it comes to geologic phenomena, the difference between renewal and cataclysm can walk a fine line. On All of My Faults Are Stress Related, Kim Hannula elucidates the distinction between causes and triggers. Citing an article about the Zipingpu Dam that concludes that the weight of the reservoir might have triggered an earthquake, Hannula…

The Buzz: As the World Turns

As the Earth’s tectonic plates shift and grind miles below our feet, we feel the effects on the surface in the form of earthquakes and volcanic activity. As Ed Yong of Not Exactly Rocket Science and Chris Rowan of Highly Allochthonous explain, earthquakes far from tectonic plate boundaries may be aftershocks of more violent seismic…

The Buzz: Earth Science Week

Last week, ScienceBloggers celebrated Earth Science Week with a flood of geocentric posts. This year’s theme this was Understanding Climate, and was the basis for a whole host of events in the coming days. Tuesday was No Child Left Inside Day, dedicated to taking kids outside to learn and play. If you weren’t able to…

The Buzz: Eruptive Media

This week, Eruptions’ Erik Klemetti sparked interest in the recent rumblings heard coming from Mt. Rainier in Washington State when he responded to a reader’s comment on increased seismic activity in the area over the past month. Klemetti’s response post, which reported on concrete facts surrounding the geologic events and featured a detailed graph of…

Last weekend, some ultra-powerful movers, shakers, and carvers of our planet caught ScienceBloggers’ attentions. First, researchers debated the potential for Mt. Saint Helens to form a supervolcano, an extraordinarily large volcano with the potential to cause massive wildlife destruction and devastating impacts on climate. Bloggers also discussed two megafloods: one that permanently separated Great Britain…

In the wake of Monday’s earthquake in the L’Aquila region of Italy that killed over 200 people, news emerged that one Italian scientist had predicted the earthquake less than two weeks earlier. Giampaolo Giuliani’s predictions were broadcast on March 28 but was dismissed by Italian authorities–and rightly so, according to ScienceBloggers. The radon-measurement technique Giuliani…

Geologists have been keeping a close watch on the volcanic activity brewing at Mount Redoubt, the 9,000 foot (2,700 m) volcano found in Alaska’s Aleutian Range. In response to the eruption at Redoubt on Thursday morning that released a 65,000 foot (20,000 m) ash column, the Alaska Volcano Observatory raised its Volcano Alert level to…

A recent influx of geobloggers on ScienceBlogs has brought rocks, mountains, and their fiery relatives volcanoes into the spotlight. Whether they’re talking about unusual uses of earthquake jargon, volcanic eruptions in the South Pacific, or their fantasy geology curriculum for undergraduates, these bloggers stay down to earth. Remarked veteran ScienceBlogger Chris Rowan of Highly Allochthonous,…