Neuroscience

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Category archives for Neuroscience

The Stupor Bowl

Deservedly or not, jocks have a reputation for being less cerebral than beaker jockeys and bookworms. But when it comes to American football, brain damage can be all in a day’s work. On The Pump Handle, Liz Borkowski highlights a recent article by Ben McGrath in the New Yorker, addressing “the effects of repeated brain…

Letters and numbers are often mentally grouped together; they’re both simple sets of symbols that are the building blocks for much more complex concepts, and mastering their relationships is a cornerstone of early education. But while illiteracy becomes a major social stigma almost immediately after a young person is introduced to letters, most people can…

Late Wednesday evening, a terrible disaster began to unfold in the ScienceBlogs universe: word emerged that a zombie attack was taking place in our bloggers’ homes. While the attack was believed to have begun somewhere in the southeastern United States, with patient zero Scicurious, it has now spread across the continent and even as far…

Team USA’s World Cup dreams may have been dashed by Ghana over the weekend, but there’s nary a bad word to be said by the performance of its goalkeeper, Tim Howard, who again proved he’s capable of hanging with his peers from the global soccer powerhouses. But besides his spectacular saves, the one thing World…

Kenny Rogers may have outlined a comprehensive life philosophy in terms of poker strategy, but in his pantheon of axioms, more important than knowing when to hold and/or fold ‘em is knowing when to walk away. Unfortunately, life is more often like a slot machine than a game of poker. According to new neuroscience research,…

Williams Syndrome and Racial Bias

Yesterday’s edition of the journal Current Biology featured an interesting study on Williams Syndrome, a genetic condition marked by cognitive deficits but also a several common personality traits. People with Williams are excessively outgoing and friendly, are often musically talented, and, most importantly to this study, show no social fear. Researchers at the University of…

Introducing The Thoughtful Animal

Start your week off by welcoming the newest member of the to the ScienceBlogs family: Jason Goldman of The Thoughtful Animal. Jason is a doctoral student studying cognition and behavior at the University of Southern California. You may already be familiar with Jason’s blog, his Pi Day Contest pie, or his involvement in Research Blogging,…

The Bright Side of the Blues

On The Frontal Cortex, Jonah Lehrer explores the cognitive consequences of depression and happiness, explaining that the way we feel has a huge impact on the way we think. First, Jonah shares an article he wrote for the New York Times Magazine, in which he says the blues can be “a clarifying force, focusing the…

Belief and the Brain

You don’t have to be brain-damaged to feel the presence of God, but it just might help. On Neurophilosophy, Mo analyzes a recent study into feelings of “self-transcendence” among individuals afflicted with brain lesions. Those with tumors in the posterior regions of the brain were more likely to identify as religious, and feelings of “creative…

Synthetic Voices & Musical Notes

On Oscillator, Christina Agapakis lays out some of the history of synthetic biology. While in the last century this field has employed molecular and informational toolkits, in centuries past inventors relied on grosser modes of simulation. Such was the case with eighteenth century wetware, which aspired “to make machines look and feel more like living…